Health watch

first_imgA recent online survey in Germany, commissioned by National Starch, found that consumers were 20% more likely to buy bakery products if they had added health claims. These included “helps to control blood sugar levels”, “increases dietary fibre intake”, “promotes a healthy digestive system” and “delivers prebiotic properties”.A total of 1,007 men and women aged between 25 and 65 were sampled.White sliced bread was found to benefit significantly when it had added health claims, such as “increases dietary fibre intake and promotes a healthy digestive system”. The survey said this could increase sales by 10-26% compared with a standard white loaf.The least popular claim in the study was “delivers prebiotic properties”..EC regulations, which came into force last month, however, state that health claims on products must conform to strict conditions.Regulation No 1924/2006 of the European Parliament is unified across the EU. Nutrition claims and conditions applying to them include: low fat – the claim can only be made where the product contains no more than 3% fat; low sodium – the claim can only be made where the product contains no more than 0.12% sodium; and low sugar – the claim may only be made where the product contains no more than 5% sugar.Other health claims include: high fibre – a product must have at least 6% fibre; high source of protein – the product must contain at least 10% of the Dietary Reference Values (DRV); and high source of vitamins and minerals – the product must contain at least 15% DRV.last_img read more

Mary Kay Thornsberry

first_imgMary Kay Thornsberry, age 79 of Batesville, Indiana passed away on Tuesday, August 18, 2020 at the Waters of Batesville.  She was born on May 17, 1941 to James and Rose (nee: Swango) Hacker in Batesville.The 1960 Batesville High School graduate worked for Margaret Mary Community Hospital in the Medical Records department for many years.She married David Thornsberry on March 21, 1963 at the United Methodist Church and they celebrated their 57th wedding anniversary earlier this year.Mary Kay was an avid mushroom hunter. She liked playing bingo and doing different types of art, like coloring and painting. Quite recently she helped her daughter embellish her wedding dress with many crystals. One of her most thrilling moments in life was when she had the opportunity to touch a live shark in the water.She will be dearly missed by her husband, David; and daughter Connie (Troy) Thornsberry-Moore of Connersville; and brother, Harry Hacker of Batesville.In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her brother, Jim Hacker; sister, Connie Paul and infant daughter, Amy Jolene Thornsberry.Her wishes were to be cremated.  Services will be private.You are welcomed to leave a message at www.meyersfuneralhomes.com on Mary Kay’s obituary page for the family in the online guestbook.last_img read more

Bamford scores but young Blues lose

first_imgChelsea’s Under-21 side suffered a second successive home defeat, going down 3-1 against Middlesbrough on Friday evening.Striker Patrick Bamford scored for the Blues youngsters who are still awaiting their first win at Brentford’s Griffin Park ground, where they were recently beaten 4-1 by Liverpool.Lewis Sirrell gave the visitors the lead with an excellent individual goal when he tricked his way into the area and found the bottom corner.Earlier, Boro’s Ryan Brobbel sent a thumping shot against the post, while Chelsea’s best chance of the first half fell to Bamford, whose effort was cleared off the line by Paul Weldon.Bamford made no mistake when he pounced on a loose ball 10 minutes after the interval and rifled home an equaliser.But a defensive lapse then led to Charlie Wyke being given space in the box to fire through keeper Jamal Blackman’s legs.And Matthew Waters was given similar room to shoot past an exposed Blackman with five minutes remaining.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Can Networks Design Themselves?

first_imgA molecular biologist and a physicist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel (see also 09/26/2003) wrote a paper in PNAS1 with an intriguing title: “Spontaneous evolution of modularity and network motifs.”  Can a network arise spontaneously?    Biologists increasingly speak of the interaction of genes, proteins and metabolic processes in terms of networks (e.g., 12/20/2004, 03/22/2004, 01/28/2004, 01/27/2003, 01/10/2003).  The networks with which most of us are familiar, like the power grid or internet, came about with intensive programming and intentional engineering.  After the network architecture and the rules of interaction were defined, however, many unforeseen and spectacular patterns emerged.  It could be argued that each emergent property of the internet had its roots in intelligent causes, however, since only sentient beings – humans – use the internet, and they do so with purpose and intent.  In biological system there are also characteristic network-like patterns.  Could these have arisen without purpose and intent?  For Kashtan and Alon to prove this, they need to establish that networking behavior can be an emergent property of the molecules of the cell, without any programming.    In the history of computer software design, one important revolution was the invention of modular programming.  Early programmers got tangled in their own “spaghetti code,” writing routines that jumped to other routines in such complex ways that the entire system became one single point of failure.  Programmers realized that certain functions could be modularized, or segregated into independent routines that, though part of the big system, focused only on their own task.  A module for addition, for instance, might take two undefined inputs, and have the function: “add these two inputs together.”  The next module up the chain can call this module and give it any two numbers, and be assured the sum will be faithfully returned.  Computer systems and networks built with a modular design were found to be much easier to maintain, and became much more robust against perturbations.  A module could be upgraded or replaced without requiring a rewrite of the entire system.  Biological networks also appear to work in modular fashion.  Kashtan and Alon believe that they have found purely natural reasons for why this is so:Biological networks have an inherent simplicity: they are modular with a design that can be separated into units that perform almost independently.  Furthermore, they show reuse of recurring patterns termed network motifs.  Little is known about the evolutionary origin of these properties.  Current models of biological evolution typically produce networks that are highly nonmodular and lack understandable motifs.  Here, we suggest a possible explanation for the origin of modularity and network motifs in biology.  We use standard evolutionary algorithms to evolve networks.  A key feature in this study is evolution under an environment (evolutionary goal) that changes in a modular fashion.  That is, we repeatedly switch between several goals, each made of a different combination of subgoals. We find that such “modularly varying goals” lead to the spontaneous evolution of modular network structure and network motifs.  The resulting networks rapidly evolve to satisfy each of the different goals. Such switching between related goals may represent biological evolution in a changing environment that requires different combinations of a set of basic biological functions.  The present study may shed light on the evolutionary forces that promote structural simplicity in biological networks and offers ways to improve the evolutionary design of engineered systems.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)In short, if the environment is modular, the network will become modular.  This has been the problem, they reason, with computer models of evolution.  Modelers used to give the computer a fixed goal and let the evolutionary algorithm figure out the way to reach it, by rewarding each routine’s “fitness” as it got warmer.  These two researchers, instead, tried routinely switching the goal during the run.  The networks that won out in the end were the modular ones:The networks evolved under modularly varying goals were able to adapt to nearly perfect solutions for each new goal, within about three generations after the goal was switched.  This evolvability was caused by the fact that the evolved networks for the different goals differed only slightly.  For example, in many cases they differed in the threshold value of a single neuron, allowing switching between the networks with a single mutation….Networks that evolve under modularly varying goals seem to discover the basic subproblems common to the different goals and to evolve a distinct structural module to implement each of these subproblems.  Evolution under modularly varying goals produces networks that can rapidly adapt to each of the different goals by only a few rewiring changes.So the winners evolved not only to be modular, but to be evolvable.  This, they think, is the secret of how biological networks became so robust in spite of changing circumstances.  Once a module for chemotaxis arose, for instance, a bacterium could reuse it with just a few “rewiring changes” if the chemical attractant changed.  But who is doing the discovering?  The subject of their sentence was, “Networks that evolve… discover…”  The language of intent continues in another sentence in the ending discussion.  Watch the subject:In such cases [evolution with fixed goals], when the goal changes, the networks take a relatively long time to adapt to the new goal, as if it starts evolution from scratch.  Under modularly varying goals, in contrast, adaptation to the new goal is greatly speeded up by the presence of the existing modules that were useful for the previous goal.That last sentence used a passive voice verb: “adaptation… is greatly speeded up.”  This hides the implication that the modules are seeking to adapt with goal-directed behavior.  The authors are clearly not intentionally attributing intrinsic purpose to the modules.  Their discussion of “fitness landscapes” in the subsequent paragraph treats the modules as pinballs on a bumpy landscape.  Shifting goals keeps the landscape undulating so that the pinballs don’t get trapped on “local fitness maxima.”  So is goal-effective modularity a true emergent property, as pointless and aimless as water running down a slope and seeking the least obstructed path?  They actually experimented more to clarify this possibility.  Notice the words information processing and useful:One possible explanation for the origin of the motifs in the evolved networks is that modular networks are locally denser than nonmodular networks of the same size and connectivity.  This local density tends to increase the number of subgraphs (42).  To test this possibility, we evolved networks to reach the same modularity measure Q as the networks evolved under modularly varying goals, but with no information-processing goal (see Supporting Text).  We find that these modular networks have no significant network motifs (Fig. 9).  They show relatively abundant feedback loops that are antimotifs in the networks evolved under modularly varying goals.  It therefore seems that the specific network motifs found in the evolved networks are not merely caused by local density, but may be useful building blocks for information processing.In other words, unless information processing was programmed in as a goal, mere environment-shifting produced anti-motifs – a backward step.  That is why their only success came with emphasis on achieving useful building blocks for “information processing.”  But what is “useful” to a network?  Why would a non-sentient network seek to process information?  If not the network, is there an outside agent that cares about such things?  Like the tree in the woods falling without a sound, can there be “information” without a mind to conceive of it?    At this point, they compared their computer models to actual biological networks.  Here, they could not escape portraying the genes and cells as if they were tiny sentient beings:How is evolution under modularly varying goals related to actual biological evolution?  One may suggest that organisms evolve in environments that require a certain set of basic biological functions….    [They discuss chemotaxis evolving as the chemical attractant changes.]  When environments changed, these modules adapted over evolution to sense and chemotax toward other nutrients.  Had evolution been in a fixed environment, perhaps a more optimal solution would have mixed the genes for these different tasks (e.g., a motor that can also sense and transport the nutrient into the cell), resulting in a nonmodular design….    An additional biological example occurs in development.  Different cells in the developing embryo take on different fates.  Each cell type needs to solve a similar set of problems: expressing a set of genes in response to a given time-dependent profile of a set of extracellular signals.  However, in each cell type, the identity of the input signals and the output genes is different.  Thus, in development, cells need to perform essentially the same computations on varying inputs and output: a modularly varying goal.  The solution found by evolution is a modular design where signal transduction pathways (such as mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades), which are common to many cell types, hook up to specific receptors and transcription factors that are cell type specific.  This design allows simple rewiring of the same pathways to work with diverse inputs and outputs in different cell types.  Over evolutionary time scales, this design allows the addition of new cell types without the need to evolve dedicated new pathways for each input and output….They threw in a bonus that their study might help engineers “evolve” improved networks.  But understanding biology was clearly the intent of the paper.  How to get biological design without a designer – that quest was evident in their last two sentences.  “In summary,” they said, “this study presents a possible mechanism for spontaneous evolution of modularity and network motifs.  It will be important to extend this study to understand how evolution could generate additional design features of biological systems.”1Nadav Kashtan and Uri Alon, “Spontaneous evolution of modularity and network motifs,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, published online before print September 20, 2005, 10.1073/pnas.0503610102.Foul, time out, game over.  They just violated the No Free Lunch Principle.  You just caught them in the act.  This is the persistent sin of evolutionists, engraved with an iron stylus on their stony hearts.  They only get away with this evil because no preacher is allowed past the walls of the Darwin Party fortress to call them to repentance.  Naturalists cannot attribute will, purpose, intent and information processing to mindless entities.  This violates their core assumptions as philosophical naturalists (materialists), whose goal was to rid natural explanations of teleology (purpose, final causes).    William Dembski in his writings, especially the book No Free Lunch, drives home the point that “no evolutionary algorithm is superior to blind search” – that is, unless information has been smuggled in behind the scenes.  Consider his famous treasure island analogy.  If you are on an island where treasure is buried, and have no clues, blind search is your only option – a very inefficient method, becoming more hopeless as the size of the island increases.  A friend tells you there is a treasure map.  Encouraged by this new hope, you go to the hostel where the map is locked in a cabinet.  You find, to your despair, that there are a million treasure maps, all different, all claiming to be the right one.  In a real sense, you now have moved your blind search to another space: the space of maps, where the the correct map is the new treasure.  This analogy can be extended indefinitely: your friend says a guru knows which map is the correct one.  You go to the mountain top, only to find again, to your despair, that a million gurus await you promising you the path to enlightenment.  The only way out of this infinite regress is to get true, useful information from someone with knowledge of the treasure’s location.  Anything else is blind search.    Now, to a Darwinist, who is going to provide that information?  Surely not the environment.  Surely not random strings of DNA.  Surely not randomly floating bits of protein.  None of them can possibly have any goal or purpose in mind, or any embedded knowledge of the best way to build modular networks that grow, reproduce, and function robustly in changing environments, complete with error-checking, coded instructions.  We must emphasize this point: any attempt by a Darwinist to impose wish fulfillment, goal-directed behavior, or teleology on these molecules is strictly forbidden.  One must visualize these molecules as completely and utterly indifferent to success or failure.  They care nothing if a function is achieved, and nobody is there to cheer them on.  Kashtan and Alon conveniently left the origin of any primitive network as an unsolved problem.  Fine; they still must maintain the impersonality of that initial network.  By analogy, picture a bunch of unthinking robots that had an initial purpose imposed on them by some unexplained inventor – say, to sort and stack rocks.  Get real, now, and ask yourself: realistically, is changing the environment going to improve their modularity and evolvability?  If you come back after the magic factor of “evolutionary time scales,” will you expect to see the robots building airplanes, printing books and conducting orchestras?  Of course not.  Remember, the robots are not sentient beings.  They couldn’t care less whether some new “function” emerges, or whether they rust in a colossal heap of rubbish (a more thermodynamically favored outcome).    Where evolutionists cheat incorrigibly is by personifying molecules into purposeful entities, or by invoking mindless processes as creative agents.  Notice again how subtly they do this: “One may suggest that organisms evolve in environments that require a certain set of basic biological functions….”  This “suggestion” makes no sense unless one personifies the environment as a manager setting design requirements, and the evolving entity “needing” or “wishing” to fulfill them.  Whether invoking Tinker Bell with her mutation wand, or shuffling environments to get the desired outcome, evolutionists are playing the guru telling the treasure hunter which map is the correct one.  This is forbidden.  The only evolutionary algorithm that is permissible on Darwin Island is blind search.  The island is the size of the universe, and according to our online book, the chance of getting even one useful protein, let alone a modular, functional network that can adapt to changing environments, is less than Dembski’s “universal probability bound” of 1 chance in 10150.  It would be easier for a blindfolded man to pick a single marked penny out of a whole universe packed with pennies than to expect chance to succeed at this task.  But chance is all they have according to the No Free Lunch Principle.  And no, they cannot cheat by saying “Well, we are here, therefore it must have happened somehow.”  Unless they are willing to consider intelligent design, this is a post hoc fallacy.    In conclusion, Darwinian materialism must retreat into pantheism, or else give up in despair.  You just read two Darwinists whispering about biological entities as if they were sentient beings.  Their pantheism is implicit, despite their intent to explain biological networks in materialistic terms.  As such, they are teaching pantheistic nature religion, not science – and of all places, right there in central Israel!  This is right where Baal worship, another nature religion, was condemned by the Hebrew prophets 2800 years ago.  Where is Elijah when we need him?  Phillip Johnson?  Henry Morris?(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Sister remembers a man ‘born to lead’

first_img6 December 2013 Former South African president Nelson Mandela, who passed away on Thursday evening, will be remembered not only as an icon whose sacrifices made the world a better place, but also as a man whose achievements came at great personal cost, to himself and to his family. In separate interviews conducted earlier this year in Mandela’s home village of Qunu in the Eastern Cape, his sister Nonyekana Bulehluti and cousin Sketshetshe Mandela spoke about their relations to the revered former statesman, who passed away on Thursday evening. Bulehluti, who has since passed away, said at the time that she could still recall the days when she used to fear her “stubborn” brother”, whom she described as someone who never talked much. She remembered Mandela as someone who stood out from the rest of the family due to his beliefs in education and his insatiable curiosity. While they never had the normal sister-brother bond, due to his activism and the many years he spent in jail, she never doubted the love he had for her. “I never spent time with bhuti [older brother],” said Bulehluti, who at the time of the interview had left the original Mandela home to live with her daughter about 15 kilometres away. “When I was a teenager, he was already igqobhoka [an educated man]. He was very quiet, but loved to laugh at anything, and that’s how I remember him – laughing and laughing.” She and Mandela shared a father but were not of the same mother. Mandela’s father, Gadla Henry Mphakanyiswa, a chief by both blood and custom, had four wives, the third being Mandela’s mother Nosekeni Fanny, while Bulehluti’s mother, Nodayimani, was the fourth wife.‘You could see he was different’ While Bulehluti was not born yet when Mandela left Qunu at the age of nine to live at nearby Mqekezweni village following his father’s passing, their later interactions revealed astonishing characteristics of a man who would later lead South Africa to its first democratic elections. “He was born to lead,” she said. “You could see he was different from all of us. He questioned things and liked to be in the company of the elders. He never spent much of his time with us … and before we knew it, he was gone [to study].” However, Bulehluti explained that the family never felt abandoned or deserted by Mandela, as they were aware of his passion for politics and his desire to see his people free. “For us, it became a matter of saying – yes, he is our brother, but he does not belong to us but to the nation. It’s something that we learnt to live with over time, and I can never regret having him as a brother. Even though it was not easy at first, he has achieved what he wanted.” ‘The children must know who this hero was’ Mandela’s cousin Sketshetshe Mandela, 78, still lives in the original family yard where Mandela and his host of siblings used to play. Mandela’s father had 13 children, four boys and nine girls, but as in any African home, the house was always filled with babies and other children of relatives. While the three huts Mandela’s mother presided over in Qunu have since been demolished to make way for a modern house, traces of the old structures are still visible. Mandela mentioned in his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom, that of the three huts, one was used for cooking, one for sleeping and the other for storage. “In the hut in which we slept, there was no furniture in the Western sense … we slept on mats and slept on the ground,” he wrote. Sketshetshe, who bears a striking resemblance to Mandela’s mother Nosekeni, said that while a lot has changed since those days, the family still plants and harvests mielies as well as small scale poultry farming. “We are still living the way he [Mandela] left us. We refused to change now that he found fame, and whenever he comes, he finds us here still doing things the old way,” he said, holding up a portrait of himself and Mandela for the duration of the interview. On the walls of the living room are pictures of Mandela and other family members, together with other famous pictures taken during the struggle for liberation – perhaps an indication of how proud the family is of the man. “We want the children to know who this hero of the family was,” Sketshetshe said. “We want them to continue with the legacy and the foundation he laid for the entire Mandela family and the Madiba clan.” Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Using cover crops with fall manure applications

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Livestock producers will soon be applying manure as corn silage harvest starts. To best capture the nutrients in manure, livestock producers should incorporate fall applied manure and also consider using cover crops.The most common cover crops used with livestock manure are cereal rye, oats and radishes. However, farmers have also used wheat, clover, annual ryegrass, or almost anything they are comfortable growing.• Cereal rye is the best cool-season grass for capturing excess nitrogen. Because rye over-winters, research has shown it can capture and hold 25 to 50 pounds of nitrogen (organic form). It germinates at lower temperatures than oats so may be planted later, but less nitrogen will be recycled the later the rye is seeded.• Oats are sometimes used as a cover crop in the fall and need to be planted soon after silage harvest. Drilling oats improves germination and growth before frost. Some farmers in northwest Ohio have had great success surface seeding oats and incorporating them with shallow tillage.• Another cover crop that is excellent at recycling nitrogen is oilseed radish: a fast growing, non-legume broadleaf that needs nitrogen to grow rapidly is often used with livestock manure. Needing time to grow, radishes are usually not the best option following soybeans or corn in October.Cover crops can help livestock farmers recapture manure nutrients and conserve soil by reducing erosion. Cover crop seedings do not have to be perfect. The goal is to combine nutrient recovery and to protect the environment.last_img read more

Injured in cross-border firing, 10-day-old baby dies in J&K’s Poonch

first_imgA 10-day-old infant who was injured during cross-border firing in Poonch sector on Sunday has succumbed to the injuries at a hospital there.“The baby was undergoing treatment but unfortunately he succumbed [late on Sunday],” Deputy Commissioner Poonch Rahul Yadav said.The infant and his mother, Fatima Jan, were injured in cross-border firing in Shahpur area of Poonch district on Sunday night.The baby was yet to be named, according to the family.According to officials, the Pakistani army started firing and mortar shelling around 7.30 p.m. in Bandi Chechian, Karmara and Kerni areas of Poonch sector on the Line of Control. “A total of three persons were treated at the Poonch hospital,” the official said.last_img

Michael Ferreira wins World Amateur Billiards title for third time in six years

first_imgThree times champion Michael Ferreira: DisgruntledThere is now no disputing who the title ‘monarch of the green baize’ belongs to – Michael Ferreira, the stocky Bombay-based Indian. At Valletta in Malta last fortnight, Ferreira made history by winning the World Amateur Billiards title for the third time in six years.For,Three times champion Michael Ferreira: DisgruntledThere is now no disputing who the title ‘monarch of the green baize’ belongs to – Michael Ferreira, the stocky Bombay-based Indian. At Valletta in Malta last fortnight, Ferreira made history by winning the World Amateur Billiards title for the third time in six years.For India, Ferreira’s feat was occasion for special celebration since his opponent in the final was Subhas Agarwal which made it the first time that two Indians have figured in the final of an international sporting event.For Ferreira, however, victory almost eluded his outstretched cue. When the last session of the semi-final against England’s Norman Dagley, former title-holder and Ferreira’s arch-rival, started, Ferreira was trailing by 735 points, an almost unbeatable margin.But in what he himself described later as a “miracle”, Mike as he is fondly known, pulled off a sensational wafer-thin victory to march into the all-Indian finals. Exulted Ferreira after defeating Dagley: “For anyone who believes there is no God and the age of miracles is over, I’ve got news for you baby. Miracles do happen, there is a God above and at the moment he is showering blessings on the Indians.”Disappointing Response: Tragically, the limited following that the game attracts in this country ensured that what should have been hailed as a historic occasion was sidelined by the vicissitudes of the Indian cricket team against the West Indies. Undoubtedly, Ferreira deserved much more.Ferreira first won the title at Melbourne in 1977, lost it to Paul Mifsud of Malta in Sri Lanka in 1979 and regained it at New Delhi in 1981 defeating Dagley, a London bus-driver. Ferreira’s feat is only rivalled somewhat by Australia’s Bob Marshall, who managed to bag the title four times – but over a period of 26 years.advertisementIncidentally, the list of two-time title-holders includes another Indian, Wilson Jones. Ironically enough, the second time that Jones won the title in 1964 was the year Ferreira started competing at the international level.But even then, he had all the makings of a champion. In his first bid in 1964, he finished third and only lost to Jones and runner-up Jack Karneham by very slim margins. His next bid was at Colombo in 1967, where a painful leg injury forced him out of the tournament but not before he had dazzled the billiards world with the highest tournament break of 507.He topped that in his next international appearance in the 1969 World Amateur Championships in London by becoming the first Indian to chalk up an official break of 600. His 629 in that tournament stood as a world record till it was eclipsed by Sri Lanka’s Mohammed Lafir in Bombay in 1973.Ferreira finished second in that tournament and at that stage it appeared that he lacked the final championship edge to make it to the top. After London, Ferreira went into a slump and it looked like India’s hopes of a second world billiards champion had faded. Ferreira had been chasing the title for over a decade without success but most people underestimated his tremendous fighting spirit.Steady Improvement: Billiards players, like good wine, usually mature with age and Ferreira was showing signs of doing just that, practising for long hours and getting more consistency into his game. In Melbourne, in the 1977 championships, he dramatically dispelled any doubts about his big match temperament and became the second Indian to win the title.If any further doubts about his lack of the killer instinct remained, they received the same treatment in 1981 in New Delhi: he demolished record after record with the brilliance of his table craft.Billiards’s gain, however, has been badminton’s loss. Ferreira was one of the top schoolboy badminton players at St Joseph’s, Darjeeling, and would probably have taken seriously to the game had not an injured elbow ended his badminton career at an early age. He switched to billiards and continued to play after his arrival in Bombay to study law and eventually join his father, a well-known barrister, in the family profession. His work, however, gave him little time for practice and less so when he decided to join Voltas as a law officer.The other Tata company, TOMCO, always on the lookout for sporting talent, quickly absorbed him and gave him facilities where he could spend long hours at practice and play. The results were immediate and spectacular. In 1966, he became the first Indian to defeat the indomitable Wilson Jones. He was then a mere 27, a relative babe by billiards standards. The rest, as they say, is history.advertisementDisillusionment: Unfortunately, the world champion is still a frustrated man. His success has been rudely ignored by the Government. Even after winning his second world title in 1981, Ferreira says he received not one word of congratulations from the state or the Union Government.The only grudging acknowledgement of his existence has been the Shivaji Chhatrapati Award and Arjuna Award. Says he bitterly: “Our cricketers are feted and rewarded for their moderate successes. What will I have to do to deserve similar treatment?”That bitterness comes through eloquently in his writing whenever he takes on reporting assignments for Indian dailies. In his dispatch from Malta after beating Dagley, he wrote: “I was alarmed by the fact that my play had been deteriorating steadily for reasons I could not analyse other than an intense desire to win and prove to the honourable Mr N.K.P. Salve and others of his like that India has more than just Prudential World Cup winners.”It is precisely for that reason that Ferreira has dissuaded his two sons from following in his footsteps. One son, Mark, took to tennis instead and seems to have inherited some of the famous Ferreira talent. He is now in California on a tennis scholarship and has already registered quite a few creditable victories.But Ferreira’s real inspiration is his wife, Fay. She accompanies him on every world tournament since 1977 and according to Ferreira, was responsible for his win last fortnight. “When I was trailing just before the last session, she told me that I had as good as lost so why not relax and enjoy my game. She then slipped a picture of St Jude, the patron saint of desperate cases, into my hand,” he says, adding with a twinkle in his eye, “in fact, St Jude is the joint holder of the title with me.”last_img read more