New edition of Voluntary but not Amateur

London Voluntary Service Council has published the a new edition of their classic reference guide Voluntary But Not Amateur.London Voluntary Service Council has published the a new edition of their classic reference guide Voluntary But Not Amateur. The sixth edition, aimed at new managers and management committee members, includes new sections on recent legislation such as the Human Rights Act, green issues, and whistle-blowing.Voluntary But Not Amateur is available from the legal section of the UK Fundraising Bookshop. Order it online now and save 20% on the list price. Advertisement Howard Lake | 26 October 2000 | News  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis New edition of Voluntary but not Amateur read more

Ginnie Mae Outstanding MBS Steady at $2T Threshold

first_img February 13, 2019 1,274 Views in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Servicing Tagged with: Ginnie Mae Ginnie Mae I MBS Ginnie Mae II MBS MBS The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Ginnie Mae Outstanding MBS Steady at $2T Threshold Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Share Save Subscribe Ginnie Mae Outstanding MBS Steady at $2T Threshold Ginnie Mae on Wednesday announced that issuance of its mortgage-backed securities (MBS) totaled $29.930 billion in January. A breakdown of its January issuance includes $28.661 billion of Ginnie Mae II MBS and $1.269 billion of Ginnie Mae I MBS, which includes $1.066 billion of loans for multifamily housing. A total outstanding principal balance of $2.053 trillion is an increase from $1.924 trillion in January 2018. In its previous report, Ginnie Mae MBS totaled $30.291 billion in December 2018 with the breakdown comprising 28.166 billion of Ginnie Mae II MBS and $2.125 billion of Ginnie Mae I MBS, which includes $1.977 billion of loans for multifamily housing. The past total outstanding principal balance of $2.042 trillion reflected an increase from $1.913 trillion in December 2017. As reported in an article by The Wall Street Journal in January 2019, Ginnie Mae had expressed concerned about risks from nonbank lenders, whose share of home loans has ballooned since the financial crisis. The agency, for the first time in years, demanded that lenders improve their financial metrics before receiving full approval to continue issuing mortgage bonds backed by them. According to the publication, the agency also conducted stress tests of business partners, to check on their monthly cash-flow obligations under reduced loan production and increased delinquencies.The article pointed out that thirty-four percent of securities issued by Ginnie Mae were serviced by nonbank lenders in 2014—the share of which has now increased to 61 percent. Two main reasons—a cooling housing market and mortgage refinancing falling to its lowest level in 18 years—have raised concerns about nonbank lenders’ ability to meet their financial obligations. It also noted that a failure on the part of these servicers, and losses thereafter could end up becoming a burden on the taxpayer.Ginnie Mae I MBS are modified pass-through mortgage-backed securities on which registered holders receive separate principal and interest payments on each of their certificates. These include single-family, multifamily, manufactured home and project construction loans. Ginnie Mae II MBS are modified pass-through mortgage-backed securities for which registered holders receive an aggregate principal and interest payment from a central paying agent. The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Related Articles Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Donna Joseph is a Dallas-based writer who covers technology, HR best practices, and a mix of lifestyle topics. She is a seasoned PR professional with an extensive background in content creation and corporate communications. Joseph holds a B.A. in Sociology and M.A. in Mass Communication, both from the University of Bangalore, India. She is currently working on two books, both dealing with women-centric issues prevalent in oppressive as well as progressive societies. She can be reached at [email protected] Ginnie Mae Ginnie Mae I MBS Ginnie Mae II MBS MBS 2019-02-13 Donna Joseph  Print This Post Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Previous: Why Half a Million Americans Are Homeless Next: FHFA: 30 Years of Protecting Homeowners The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago About Author: Donna Joseph Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days agolast_img read more

Students explore poverty in urban areas over winter break

first_imgPhoto courtesy Members of an Urban Plunge team in Pittsburgh pose after packing boxes of food for distribution. Urban Plunge teams spent part of their winter breaks immersed in struggling urban communities across the country.Adam Gustine, assistant director of seminars at the CSC, said he expects Urban Plunge to help students understand what it takes to “build a community where everyone flourishes, particularly those who are marginalized.”The plunges are framed through the lens of Catholic social teaching, with an emphasis on a preferential option for the poor and the vulnerable. “We want to explore the overlap between the pursuit of the common good and the human dignity for each person, and how those two things play together,” Gustine said.During the four classes prior to the immersion, Gustine said the students learn about the nature of the cities and neighborhoods they will be visiting in order to try to understand the different approaches people take to combat the issues facing the sites. “We look at symptomatic issues versus root causes of these social issues,” Gustine said. “We do that so when you go on the immersion we have a frame of reference to what we’re looking at.”In just a few days, sophomore Amelia Love, who helped lead an Urban Plunge site in The Ville in St. Louis this year, said the goal was not to solve any problems but to simply trying to understand them.“It’s a great way to build solidarity in St. Louis with community members I would not have otherwise met,” Love said.After participating in an immersion both this year and last year, Love said she found it heartbreaking how overworked and understaffed the employees at the homeless center are, but she knows their work is greatly appreciated.“Change is possible, but it’s hard. But that shouldn’t be an excuse for not helping people,” Love said.Sophomore Caroline Myers participated in Urban Plunge for the first time this winter break, and stayed with a Notre Dame alumni couple in neighborhood in Denver called Sun Valley, which Myers said is the poorest zip code in all of Colorado. She said they worked with a few different nonprofits during the immersion to learn more about the homeless population in Sun Valley. One of the organizations operated with a simple mission of going into the streets in the neighborhood and having discussions with the homeless people without an agenda. Myers, who is from Denver, said she was particularly struck by a man she met named Kevin, who during their prayer broke down crying. “He talked about his struggle with alcohol … he wasn’t asking for money or a new life, but he was just wishing for God to decide what was going to happen to him,” Myers said.Although Myers lives fairly close to Sun Valley and had visited many restaurants in the area, she said she had no idea so many of the houses were for the homeless. “Being from a part of Denver where I can easily turn a blind eye to their struggles, it made me upset with myself because I’ve had the privilege of not having to realize that there was homeless housing down the street from my favorite doughnut shop,” Myers said.Tags: Center for Social Concerns, poverty, Urban Plunge While many students celebrated the holidays and spent time relaxing over winter break, some also spent a few days examining the causes and challenges of poverty in cities across America. Urban Plunge, the Center for Social Concern’s one-credit experiential learning seminar, allowed 146 students at 25 different sites to learn about organizations fighting poverty in cities close to their own hometowns. These immersions ranged from two to four days and many are affiliated with Notre Dame alumni clubs. last_img read more