To the beach!

first_imgSouth Africa’s Jean de Villiers leading the charge!Just because rugby is played in the dark, dreary days of winter, does not mean the muddy pitch can’t be traded in for soft sand and crashing waves. It’s time to swap your boots for suntan lotion. This clip is sure to inspire you, whether you want to play or watch with a cold drink. The action’s not bad either – especially the entertainment! LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img

Toulouse – A Perfect 10 – with video of last year’s final

first_imgThey recovered to go on to beat Stade Français Paris in the final at Parc des Princes and then added five straight Pool wins the next season before losing to Llanelli at Stradey Park. That defeat didn’t affect their march to another final and on their return to Wales for the Heineken Cup final at the Millennium Stadium they became the first team to successfully defend the title.Now Toulouse, who won the Heineken Cup for the fourth time at Stade de France in May, are almost half-way to matching that achievement after their fourth successive victory this season in Pool 6 with their 36-10 triumph over Glasgow Warriors.That made it 10 wins on the trot, a French record overtaking Brive’s nine wins in 1996/97 and 1997/98, and they now have 17 points from four wins this season – one of only two unbeaten records to date with Northampton Saints. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Guy Noves – Toulouse’s Head CoachGuy Noves has seen and done almost everything possible in the Heineken Cup, but even he and his four-times champion club Toulouse are within striking distance of a new landmark after making it 10 wins in a row.Only two teams in the 16-year history of the tournament have reached double figures in terms of successive victories – Munster with 13 and Leicester Tigers with 11.Munster’s record breaking run came over the 2005/06 and 2006/07 seasons and included their first title triumph at the Millennium Stadium in 2006. After losing to Sale Sharks in their opening Pool match of the 2005/06 campaign they then won eight straight games.They then won five straight Pool matches before losing their only game to date at Thomond Park in Round 6 of the 2006/07 season against Leicester Tigers.That 13-match winning streak overtook the 11 game run that saw the Tigers crowned champions in Paris in 2001. Their sequence began in Round 4 of the 2000/01 season after their defeat at Pontypridd.center_img Can they go past Munster by reaching the semi-finals this season? And can they match Leicester’s back-to-back titles?Watch this space …last_img read more

Fitness tips

first_imgMaintaining your strength and endurance throughout the season is vitally important. You’ll want your muscles to grow, and to continue to improve on your stamina, endurance and power. Accordingly products such as creatine may enable you to do that and potentially improve on your performance. However, you also need to think about your balance. In such an explosive sport this is vital.Lateral ankle sprains are common injuries amongst professional rugby union players. However, most occur in non contact situations and are down to a lack of balance on the part of the player. Incorporating a training programme which works on both balance and proprioception is one of the best ways to try and reduce this happening.Think about going to ground when carrying the ballThe circumstances where a ball carrier is tackled from the side or behind and tries to continue running can possibly lead to knee, leg or ankle injuries. If you go to ground when you feel the weight of a tackler, this could minimise the potential injury impact. You may not gain the valuable yards during the game, but you may avoid a long lay-off during the season. Try and work on this in training. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rugby Training Regime: Part 2We all know how physically demanding rugby can be. Getting your body conditioned for the start of the season can be a gruelling mix of muscle building in the gym, working on that explosive yard on the pitch, ball work and tackling. Once the season starts it may feel like the hard work is done, but in reality you’re just getting started. Your body might appear to be in perfect condition, but you have to keep it that way.Don’t forget the things you were doing before the first competitive ball was kicked. If you relied on products such as whey protein to get your body conditioned, don’t stop when the season starts. You’re not there yet. It’s a continuous process you need to keep working on to maintain that level of fitness.Take a look at our guide of rugby training tips to keep you fit and firing all season long.Proper tackling techniqueAs a sport that involves hard contact between bodies when tackling, it’s difficult to completely eliminate any form of injury. However, what you can do is work on your tackling technique and avoid dangerous tackles to try and minimise the potential risk of injury. Try and ensure you avoid hitting the ball carrier at shoulder level as this will reduce the chance of head-to-head contact. It’s important to keep your chin off your chest; your eyes open and be aware of the general play around you. Always work on this in training and it will really start to benefit you during matches.Consider balance and proprioception trainingcenter_img Fully recover from injuries prior to returning to playIn a sport that involves such contact and collisions it’s imperative to ensure that you are fully fit before taking the field. If you’re carrying an injury, however moderate you may view it you’ll be under an increased chance of suffering from another knock which could end up being much more serious. Getting proper rest and recuperation is vital after playing rugby and so when you’re injured this is even more important. Make sure you not only heal from your injury, that you also recover the full range of motion and strength and have completed full training prior to returning.last_img read more

South Africa 36 England 27: The Verdict

first_imgJOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA – JUNE 16: England captain, Chris Robshaw (L) looks dejected during the second test match between South Africa and England at Ellis Park on June 16, 2012 in Johannesburg, South Africa. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Power play: Bismarck du Plessis put in a herculean shift for the Springboks in attack and defenceBy Owain Jones, Rugby World EditorIn  a nutshellENGLAND WERE blown away by South Africa in a typically ferocious encounter at altitude in Ellis Park, Johannesburg. The Springboks tore into England from the off, with their huge ball carriers, Willem Alberts, Bismarck du Plessis and Pierre Spies repeatedly driving English defenders backwards. It was Alberts who scored first, sauntering over the line from a short distance. Du Plessis was next to crash over minutes later after more concerted pressure with impressive debutant Jonathan Joseph unlucky not to dislodge the ball after some fine defensive cover work. With the Springboks rampant, Francois Hougaard darted over from short range to leave the score 22-3 after the first quarter. Despite a Leicester-inspired try started off by the impressive Ben Youngs and finished by Toby Flood minutes later, England were still 15 points adrift as the half-time whistle went, trailing 25-10. In the second-half England rallied bravely, with two tries from Ben Youngs in the third quarter to reduce the score to seven points. With a further penalty by Flood, the deficit was cut to four points and England sniffed an unlikely victory. Sadly JP Pietersen had other ideas, quelling the uprising by scoring in the corner after an initial blistering break to leave South Africa winning battle, and the war.No way through: Debutant Jonathan Joseph looks for a gapKey MomentAfter only three minutes, the Boks were awarded a scrum deep in England’s half. Francois Hougaard fed the ball in but it fizzed out the other side of the channel, crucially without being touched by the English front-row. Willem Alberts was quickest to pounce, and scored with consummate ease. Under IRB Law 20.7 the scrum should have been reset but referee Alain Rolland and assistant Steve Walsh missed it giving South Africa vital early points on the board.Man of the Match: Bismarck du PlessisDu Plessis put in a herculean shift for the Springbosk. The muscle-bound hooker, for so long understudy to John Smit, repeatedly drove the Boks deep into England territory swatting England defenders away, notably Geoff Parling, with worrying ease. It was a performance that consolidated his position as the world’s No 1 hooker and it was no coincidence the Springboks lost shape and momentum when he left the fray with 20 minutes left on the clock.Room for improvementMuch like Wales last weekend against Australia, England were guilty of being far to sluggish in the opening quarter. They trailed 22-3 after just 18 minutes giving themselves far too much to do. They simply weren’t able to live with the aggressive ball carrying from the Springbok strike runners, falling off tackles too easily and allowing the offload as they were pummelled in the early opening exchanges. It was only in the second-half, with a raft of replacements from both sides, that England were able to gain a foothold and start the fightback.Shell shocked: Captain Chris Robshaw looks for answersIn quotes – WinnersSpringbok coach Heyneke Meyer: “We lost our way a bit in the second half because our first-phase play wasn’t good enough and we made mistakes that allowed England back into the game, but we played really great rugby in the first half. In that period we showed glimpses of what we are capable of and where we want to go as a team.”In quotes – LosersEngland coach Stuart Lancaster: “We were disappointed with the start, to give them 12 points before we got going, We know we’ve got to be better in all the little details that make the difference in winning at international level. Before half-time was the time we needed to get a foothold in the game.”center_img Match in statsEngland made 90 tackles, missing 18, a conversion rate of 83.3% compared to the Springboks who made 61 tackles and missed six, with a conversion rate of 91%Geoff Parling was England’s top tackler with 12 followed closely by Tom Johnson with 11. No South African player made it into double-figures with Marcel Coetzee the highest on sevenBoth sides made three clean breaks, but South Africa beat 18 defenders to England’s 6JP Pietersen had the best running stats, carrying the ball 79 metres. For England Ben Foden carried 58 metres followed closely by Manu Tuilagi on 53.England: Ben Foden; Chris Ashton, Jonathan Joseph (Alex Goode 78), Manu Tuilagi, David Strettle (Owen Farrell 60); Toby Flood, Ben Youngs (Lee Dickson 75); Joe Marler (Alex Corbisiero 56), Dylan Hartley (Lee Mears 75), Dan Cole, Mouritz Botha (Tom Palmer 44), Geoff Parling, Tom Johnson, Chris Robshaw (capt), Ben Morgan (Thomas Waldrom 47)Tries: Flood, Youngs (2). Pens: Flood (2) Cons: Flood (3)South Africa: Pat Lambie (Wynand Olivier 44); J P Pietersen, Jean de Villiers (capt), Frans Steyn, Bryan Habana (Ruan Pienaar 57); Morne Steyn, Francois Hougaard; Tendai Mtawarira, B du Plessis (Adriaan Strauss 61), Jannie du Plessis (Werner Kruger 62) Eben Etzebeth, Juandre Kruger (Flip van der Merwe 62) Marcel Coetzee, Willem Alberts (Keegan Daniel 52), Pierre Spies.Not used: Bjorn BassonTries: Alberts, BW Du Plessis, F Hougaard. Pens: Morne Steyn (3). Cons: Morne Steyn (2) Drop Goal: Morne Steyn (1)last_img read more

Ireland justified to use Brian O’Driscoll

first_img Time to pass it on?: Brian O’Driscoll has only a year left before he hangs up the boots, but Ireland need a contingencyBy Charlie MorganWarren Gatland will testify that losing faith in Brian O’Driscoll has long been considered a particularly toxic type of blasphemy. As Australia breezed past their hosts in Dublin though, it was tempting to begin a eulogy for the immense international career of Ireland’s senior statesman.Opposite an energetic set of Wallaby backs invigorated by Quade Cooper, O’Driscoll seemed subdued and sluggish a fortnight ago. He was far too classy to admit as much in the build-up, but a victory might have exorcised a modicum of the pain caused by his omission from the third Lions Test. In truth, there was never any danger of that.Out of his pomp: O’Driscoll failed to impress against OzThe decision to take one more year as a chief lieutenant to Joe Schmidt’s new regime appeared misguided. George Hook of the Irish Independent outed an awkward elephant in the room with two succinct sentences: “Sadly, the greatest player of his generation was anonymous. It will be the biggest tragedy in Irish rugby history if O’Driscoll is remembered for the manner of his leaving rather than the days of his pomp.”A centre who had exhausted all superlatives since debuting in 1999 limped on, his involvement in the final autumn Test against New Zealand in the balance due to the niggling calf problem that is inconveniencing his season.In fact, the fitness of O’Driscoll, Johnny Sexton and Rob Kearney dominated last week’s news. When the trio were all passed on Friday, it was a big boost for Schmidt. However, the camp had already been buoyed by some typically stubborn inspiration from their gnarled talisman.“I just can’t think of this not being a great chance,” O’Driscoll told the assembled press, 48 hours before meeting a team in pursuit of a perfect year – a team that had handed him defeat 12 times previously, a team his country had never beaten. “All you can ask is for these opportunities. You’re never guaranteed any more than that, and this is my last opportunity.”Even in adversity, O’Driscoll was never going to approach the All Blacks with anything other than unerring belief that a win was there for the taking. His words weren’t empty.In the NZ mix: BOD was more effectiveOn Sunday, Ireland injected a passionate, frenzied intensity into the first quarter that was impossible to live with. In possession or otherwise, they simply battered Steve Hansen’s charges. When Kearney snaffled a spilt ball and sprinted up the left-hand touchline to open up a 19-0 lead on 17 minutes, some at a raucous Aviva Stadium wise-cracked that last June’s 60-0 thrashing in Hamilton could be reciprocated. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The big men were to the fore, naturally. Back-rowers Peter O’Mahony, Jamie Heaslip and Sean O’Brien smashed everything in sight and scrapped ferociously at the breakdown. Cian Healy’s barnstorming bust over Richie McCaw provided a precious memory. Skipper Paul O’Connell personified physicality. Conor Murray was so good Aaron Smith looked ordinary. And there in the middle of the carnage was O’Driscoll, quietly taking his opportunity.After a wobbly pass in his own 22 following Murray’s opening try, he put in a fine display. Alongside old buddy Gordon D’Arcy (who was brilliant as well), he shackled Ben Smith and Ma’a Nonu. Some manic counter-rucking won Ireland a crucial turnover. There was a majestic take from a high-ball and some sinew-straining carries too.In an allegory of his recent years in a green jersey, O Driscoll lay prone as Nigel Owens ended the first half – his body once more surrendered to the cause. The well-worn Lazarus act ensured he took to the field for the second half, but a tackle on Brodie Retallick – 20kg bulkier – brought O’Driscoll’s afternoon to a premature close, common sense prevailing when signs of concussion surfaced.Watching on through his fingers, the veteran saw New Zealand claw their way back from 22-10 down to spoil his 128th cap – a scintillating move finished by Ryan Crotty at the death to shatter Irish hearts.When the final whistle came after Aaron Cruden’s re-taken conversion, O’Driscoll walked back out onto the pitch. He could barely look anybody in the eye. This wasn’t the disappointment of a plucky underdog. It was far more painful and deep-seated – agonising shellshock of a man convinced his side had done enough.O’Driscoll’s words in mid-week resonated through Ireland’s manic, aggressive start. That mindset will form part of his legacy.A Test pair: O’Driscoll and D’ArcyTwo seasons out from a World Cup, some argue that his 12-month extension is poorly timed on the basis that another combination would not have enough time to settle in. Well, Luke Fitzgerald – a Test match Lion and still only 26 – was extremely solid on Sunday and may yet fulfill his potential. Ulster’s own Kiwi Jared Payne, a magnificent footballer, qualifies on residency grounds next September. Keith Earls is still around and is well capable of partnering D’Arcy or Luke Marshall. In short, Ireland’s midfield garden is rosier than England’s. LONDON, ENGLAND – MAY 19: Gordon D’Arcy (R) and Brian O’Driscoll (L) of Leinster celebrate after the Heineken Cup Final between Leinster and Ulster at Twickenham Stadium on May 19, 2012 in London, United Kingdom. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Mountains of silverware for Leinster, a glorious Grand Slam and immortal moments of Lions folklore mean O’Driscoll will not be remembered for moral, ultimately empty victories such as the one at the weekend. While there may be fewer flashes of sublime skill this season, his role in eradicating self-doubt at the start of Schmidt’s tenure is essential.Last week, plenty of punters sniggered at O’Driscoll’s assertion that Ireland could beat the All Blacks. I bet they feel pretty silly now.last_img read more

Should South Africa join the Six Nations?

first_imgThe mooted change is to expand the championship rather than have the Boks replace, say, Italy. That would mean playing an extra six Tests – two more weekends. How do you fit them into an already hideously congested calendar?Some would say slot them into the fallow weeks, but there are major travel implications. South Africa may be in a similar time zone to Europe but flying there is very different to the short-haul flights currently involved. And that’s before you bring altitude into the mix.Keep the fallow weeks and there’s the knock-on effect on the club game, with star players absent for yet more domestic fixtures.Collateral damage? Fans would need deep pockets to travel to South Africa for a Six Nations fixture (Getty)And what of the fans? A trip to South Africa is much more expensive than a day trip between Cardiff and Dublin for one. How many supporters – the traditional lifeblood of this championship – will be able to afford to travel to see their team face the Boks?There’s only so much rugby that players can play and that supporters can support. The proposal is another example of possible financial gains being put ahead of player welfare. And that’s before you consider how South Africa cutting ties with their southern hemisphere foes could affect the world game…”Should South Africa join the Six Nations? Let us know what you think. Email your views to [email protected] debate appeared in the May 2020 issue of Rugby World. Champions: South Africa’s quality is clear but would they enhance the Six Nations or diminish it? (Getty) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rumours have swirled that the Springboks might join the Six Nations. But would such a move be cause for celebration or dismay? Read this debate from our May 2020 issue Should South Africa join the Six Nations?JON CARDINELLIChief writer of SA Rugby magazine“The Six Nations is rugby’s premier annual tournament. There is, however, reason to believe that the inclusion of another traditional powerhouse will strengthen the final product.The Springboks are three-time world champions. They haven’t lost a home series against a northern hemisphere side since the Lions toured in 1997. Their record in the pro era indicates that they know how to prevail in challenging European conditions.It’s fair to say that the Springboks’ inclusion would not dilute the championship, whether it is a six- or seven-team tournament.SA Rugby took its first step into the northern hemisphere when it entered two of its franchises, Cheetahs and Southern Kings, into an expanded Pro14 competition in 2017. It’s believed more franchises will follow suit, and that we could mega clashes such as Leinster against the Bulls or Sharks in future.Foot in the door: the Cheetahs, a South African franchise, are already playing regularly in Europe (Inpho)Ultimately, South African rugby may find itself in a situation where the majority of its elite players are competing in the European tournaments – either for South African or European clubs – and working towards representing the Boks in the Seven Nations.Rumours of South Africa‘s move to the North have prompted questions about the future of rugby in the South. It may be easy to walk away from a Super Rugby tournament that has lost its shine. It won’t be so easy to turn away from an annual match-up against New Zealand that is important both commercially and to supporters.”SARAH MOCKFORDEditor of Rugby World“There has long been talk of South Africa aligning with European rugby. We’ve seen two South African sides join the Pro14, but the Springboks in the Six (or, as is rumoured, Seven) Nations? This throws up more problems than solutions.last_img read more

World Cup winner Phil Vickery

first_imgThe former England prop on cooking, claustrophobia and losing his cool at the wicket What’s the best thing you’ve won in a raffle? I never win anything! Actually, I won a necklace at a charity event.Who’d be your three dream dinner party guests? Clint Eastwood is a hero of mine. I watched all his spaghetti westerns as a kid. I know he’s not everyone’s cup of tea but I’d love to meet Barack Obama. I’d love to have a brew with him.And if you talk about people you could have proper conversations with, you could talk honestly and openly, I’d love to know what was going on in Maggie Thatcher’s brain.Getting an invite: former US president Barack Obama would be on Vickery’s guest list (Getty Images)What’s the most memorable headline you’ve seen about yourself? I think it was in The Times. There was a picture of me holding two pigs on the family farm with the headline The Dude from Bude. Dude? I’m the most unsurfy person! I saw that recently, I was looking through some scrapbooks that Mum kept.Who in your career would you love to have seen get a chance at Test level?Mark Cornwell (Gloucester second-row) deserved a cap, although I’d never tell him that! Centre Joe Ewens as well. At Wasps, John Hart and Richard Birkett were unbelievable players.What’s the best book you’ve read? It’s a bit controversial because of what’s happened to him since but It’s Not About The Bike by Lance Armstrong. I know the guy used drugs and everything about it is wrong, but he still had to peddle the thing. Drugs or no drugs, it’s wow.How has the pandemic impacted on your leisurewear business Raging Bull? Online we’re actually trading really well. Covid has made us all reassess how we do things. The spirit and resilience of the people around me has blown me away. And you have a new venture…Yeah, since winning MasterChef in 2011 I’ve done cooking demos, shows, a lot of promotional work. I love food, it’s the farmer in me. A friend and I decided to open a restaurant in Cheltenham. Covid put that on hold but we recently launched a ‘click and collect’ service (no3restaurants.com), taking what we can from the menu. Good British food.Related: Phil Vickery joins the restaurant tradeDo you have any future goals?I’m bloody ambitious and anything’s possible. I did a fantastic business course last year on leadership and mindset and a can-do attitude. It’s also being a better husband, a better dad, a better guy. At the same time it’s about being me. Being me is alright! LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Downtime with… World Cup winner Phil VickeryWhat’s the funniest thing you’ve heard on the pitch? Wasps were playing Newcastle at Adams Park, just after the 2007 World Cup. This young lad, a back-rower, was calling me fat this and fat that, all the usual stuff. He kept on and on.It got to the point, we were stood at a lineout and he was still going on. I said, “For f**k’s sake, if I knew your name I’d give you some banter back!” His team wet themselves. But I genuinely didn’t know who he was!Who would you like to be stuck in a lift with? I’d love to meet Billy Connolly, I really would. Yes, he’s a comedian but he’s a story teller. I’ve pretty much watched everything he’s done. You connect with him. He doesn’t look for the magic, it’s just there. He finds normal people magic.Do you have any phobias? I wouldn’t say I freak out but I’m a bit claustrophobic. Like getting in a lift with a lot of people or getting on the Tube when it’s busy.How did you get your Raging Bull nickname? In 1997 I played for an ERP (English Rugby Partnership) XV against the All Blacks at Ashton Gate. I was up against Bull Allen and someone asked Clive Woodward, “How do you think the young guy got on against the Bull?”He said, “We’ve got our own bull, the Raging Bull.” And it stuck from that.What’s your most embarrassing moment? I don’t actually get really embarrassed. I don’t mind making myself look silly or doing anything crazy, it doesn’t particularly bother me.But there was a charity cricket match a couple of years ago, I was playing for Lady Bathurst at Cirencester. I opened the batting and said to the opposition, “Go steady, I’ve not played cricket for years.”This long-haired supermodel comes running down and whacks one at me. Next ball, he does it again. I walked down the wicket and said, “Do that again and I’ll snap your neck.”He started laughing, then he put one down again. I chased him with a cricket bat. A bit of the Raging Bull coming out of me! But I had warned him. He overstepped the mark.Putting bat to ball: Vickery shows off his cricketing skills on the beach ahead of RWC 2003 (Getty Images)What really annoys you? Bad manners. Not responding. It costs nothing to say hello or good morning or thank you.If your house was on fire, what one item would you save? Family pictures. Of my grandparents, Kate and the kids.What would be your Mastermind specialist subject? Cattle artificial insemination. Bet they’ve never had that on the show before. I’m a qualified cattle inseminator, though I’d have do a refresher course now.What’s the silliest thing you’ve bought? When I was about 20, I bought a Jag XK convertible. I thought, ‘Wow, this is amazing’. But it was useless, you couldn’t fit anything in it. I was a 125kg front-row forward. If I had a bad time with my back, it took me longer to get in and out the car than it did to get to where I was going. That and the fuel bill. Champions! Phil Vickery of England poses with the Webb Ellis Cup in 2003 (Getty Images) This article originally appeared in the July 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Fabien Galthie cleared of breaking Covid protocols by FFR

first_img An internal investigation by FFR clears Fabien Galthie of breaking Covid protocols (Getty Images) France’s match was postponed against Scotland after 11 players and five staff members tested positive for Covid. Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links. Fabien Galthie cleared of breaking Covid protocols by FFRAn internal investigation into the handling of the Covid-19 outbreak within France’s Six Nations squad has cleared head coach Fabien Galthie of any wrongdoing.French Rugby Federation (FFR) President Bernard Laporte admitted that Galthie had left the training camp following the nation’s win in Italy, although Laporte maintained that the head coach wore a mask and didn’t break any Covid protocols. He left the training camp to watch his son, Mathis, play rugby in Paris.Related: Fabien Galthie left bubble, France chief Bernard Laporte confirmsGalthie was one of five staff members to test positive for Covid following France’s fixture with Ireland in the second round, while a further 11 players also tested positive. Tournament organisers postponed France’s match with Scotland last weekend due to the outbreak.However, following an internal investigation, the FFR medical committee have cleared Galthie of any wrongdoing. Despite the conclusion, a FFR spokesperson said that the investigation report would not be made public.Roger Salamon, the head of FFR’s medical committee, told RTL: “In my report, I mention it at the start. It is perfectly clear that what he has done. He had the right to do what he did, and there was no particular risk.” With French sports minister Roxana Maracineanu threatening to withdraw France from the championship if the investigation wasn’t thorough enough, les Bleus will now travel to England for their fixture on March 13.France’s match against Scotland is rescheduled for March 26, six days after the intended conclusion of the championship. Both France and Wales have won all of their games so far.Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet. Or, subscribe to the print edition to get magazine delivery to your door.last_img read more

Tim Vivian receives Historical Society of the Episcopal Church Burr…

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Posted Aug 24, 2015 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tim Vivian receives Historical Society of the Episcopal Church Burr Prize Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Featured Events Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Historical Society of the Episcopal Church press release] The Historical Society of the Episcopal Church is pleased to announce its recipient of the 2015 Nelson R. Burr Prize, the Rev. Dr. Tim Vivian. Dr. Vivian teaches in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies of California State University, Bakersfield. He is honored for his article “Wake the Devil from His Dream: Thomas Dudley, Quincy Ewing, Religion, and the “Race Problem’ in the Jim Crow South” published in the December 2014 issue of Anglican and Episcopal History. The selection committee noted the article makes excellent use of primary and secondary sources to create two portraits in a landscape of racial division that we, sadly, still recognize today.The Burr prize honors the renowned scholar Nelson R. Burr, whose two-volume A Critical Bibliography of Religion in America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1961) and other works constitute landmarks in the field of religious historiography. Each year a committee of the Society selects the author of the most outstanding article in the Society’s journal, Anglican and Episcopal History, as recipient. The award also honors that which best exemplifies excellence and innovative scholarship in the field of Anglican and Episcopal history.Vivian received a B.A in English and M.A. in Comparative Literature from U.C. Santa Barbara, an M.A. in American Literature at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, and an Interdisciplinary Ph.D. (Classics, History, Religious Studies) at U.C. Santa Barbara. Vivian is a dedicated scholar in the field of early Christianity, with emphasis on Coptic Studies and Early Christian Monasticism. He has taught at CSUB in a variety of capacities since 1990.He serves as priest-in-charge at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Bakersfield and received his M.Div. from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific. He has also been a Henry R. Luce Post-Doctoral Fellow at Yale Divinity School.Vivian has published thirteen books, over fifty articles, and over a hundred book reviews in a wide variety of scholarly publications. His scholarship is also based on substantial archeological field work. He has participated in two excavations in Egypt, serving as a director and faculty member at the excavation of the monastery of John Kolobos. He served as project historian for the team restoring and studying the 13th century wall paintings at the monastery of Saint Anthony in Egypt.For over a century HSEC has been an association dedicated to preserving and disseminating information about the history of the Episcopal Church. Founded in Philadelphia in 1910 as the Church Historical Society, its members include scholars, writers, teachers, ministers (lay and ordained) and many others who have an interest in the objectives and activities of the Historical Society. Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL People Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Full coverage: Installation of Presiding Bishop Michael Curry

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Posted Nov 1, 2015 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curry Installation, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Full coverage: Installation of Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA last_img read more