Luke Thompson Tommy Makinson and Mark Percival me

first_imgLuke Thompson, Tommy Makinson and Mark Percival met up with the rest of the squad in Manchester on Friday.And judging on the pictures below the Saints boys look sharp!England play four Tests this autumn; France at Leigh Sports Village on October 17, before a three-Test series against New Zealand at the KCOM Stadium in Hull (October 27), Anfield in Liverpool (November 4) and Elland Road in Leeds (November 11).last_img

Well be celebrating victory soon – Sudanese community leader

center_img Sudanese demonstrators pose for a photograph to celebrate after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> A Sudanese demonstrator waves a national flag as he arrives to protest against the army’s announcement that President Omar al-Bashir would be replaced by a military-led transitional council, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS Sudanese military officer joins demonstrators as they celebrate after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer A Sudanese demonstrator uses a traditional drum to celebrate after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer Sudanese demonstrators celebrate after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer FILE PHOTO: People are seen in the streets after televised statement by Defence Minister Awad Mohamed Ahmed Ibn Auf in Khartoum, Sudan April 11. 2019 in this still image taken from a video obtained from social media. Noon Gailoub/via REUTERS A Sudanese demonstrator waves a national flag as he arrives to protest against the army’s announcement that President Omar al-Bashir would be replaced by a military-led transitional council, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERSA Sudanese demonstrator waves a national flag as he arrives to protest against the army’s announcement that President Omar al-Bashir would be replaced by a military-led transitional council, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS In the wake of recent political upheaval in Sudan, Malta’s Sudanese community is cautiously optimistic about the future.Speaking to Newsbook.com.mt, the leader of the Sudanese community in Malta Mohamed Ibrahim, said that ‘soon they will be celebrating their victory.’His optimism comes as the country’s long standing leader President Omar Al-Bashir was toppled after almost 30 years controlling Sudan and later North Sudan.  The move follows months of protests in the capital Khartoum in which students and locals have taken to the streets objecting to the government’s planned price increases in food and fuel.This came to a head on Thursday when a military coup led by the Sudan’s Defence Minister Mohammed Ahmed Awad Ibn Auf, overthrew and detained Bashir on Thursday and replaced him the following day with a transitional military council.In addition to calling for a transitional period for democratic elections, the council also announced that instead of sending Bashir to the International Criminal Court in the Hague, it would try Bashir in Sudan.Quoting a police spokesperson Reuters reports that around 16 people had been killed and a further 20 were injured by gunfire at protests on both Thursday and Friday. Government buildings and private citizens property were also damaged in the protests.300,000 or 10,000?In the past three decades, Bashir had been accused of committing an array of human rights abuses against the country’s people.The International Criminal Court issued a warrant for his arrest back in 2009 and 2010 when it charged Al-Bashir with committing crimes against humanity and genocide. The UN had estimated that the Darfur conflict 300,000 people were killed and nearly 3 million have been displaced because of it.  This is compared to the fraction the Sudanese government put forward (10,000).The ICC prosecutor said that Mr Al-Bashir, ‘masterminded and implemented a plan to destroy in substantial part’ the killing of three ethnic tribes in the region.‘Our dignity has been brushed [aside by] this government. We have been killed and separated from our families, forced to flee around the world. Sudan is a rich country but we had become the poorest people forced to become beggars standing in rows in refugee camps waiting for assistance from locals and international organisations,’ Ibrahim says.Scenes from Al Fashir, Sudan Credit: Saddam Salih‘He needs to go’Mr Ibrahim explained to Newsbook.com.mt in December last year, that the protests against Bashir were a regular occurrence.They were aimed at ousting him and readdressing the inequality and lack of access to food, water and transportation. Although he and others left Sudan, nothing has changed, things have only gotten worse.Malta’s Sudanese community calling for their nation’s leader to go‘Those who are supporting the government, they don’t have any problems and they don’t feel the same equality others are facing in their lives. It’s been happening time and again. We have no solution so we should throw him out,’ he told Newsbook.com.mt in December last year.’To raise awareness of the situation happening in Khartoum, the Sudanese Community organised a demonstration in Valletta as part of the growing solidarity in world capitals.‘That’s the least we can do here.’ Sudanese military officers and a demonstrator pose for a photograph in celebration after Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer A Sudanese military officer and a demonstrator celebrate after Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer SharePrint A Sudanese military officer and demonstrators gesture in celebration after Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringerlast_img read more

Blow to Turkeys Erdogan as opposition wins big in Istanbul

first_imgSupporters attend a rally of Ekrem Imamoglu, mayoral candidate of the main opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP), in Beylikduzu district, in Istanbul, Turkey, June 23, 2019. REUTERS/Kemal AslanSupporters attend a rally of Ekrem Imamoglu, mayoral candidate of the main opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP), in Beylikduzu district, in Istanbul, Turkey, June 23, 2019. REUTERS/Kemal Aslan Turkey’s main opposition claimed a decisive victory on Sunday in Istanbul’s re-run election, dealing one of the biggest blows to President Tayyip Erdogan during his 16 years in power and promising a new beginning in the country’s largest city.Ekrem Imamoglu, mayoral candidate of the secularist Republican People’s Party (CHP), was leading with 54% of votes versus 45% for Erdogan’s AK Party (AKP) candidate, with more than 99% of ballots opened, Turkish broadcasters said.The election was Istanbul’s second in three months after results of an initial March vote were scrapped, setting up the do-over as a test of Turks’ ability to check what many saw as their president’s increasingly authoritarian power.“Today, 16 million Istanbul residents have renewed our faith in democracy and refreshed our trust in justice,” Imamoglu told supporters.His AKP opponent, former Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, congratulated him and wished him “all the luck” in serving Istanbul, Turkey’s commercial hub. Erdogan also tweeted his congratulations to the CHP candidate.Imamoglu had won the original mayoral election on March 31 by a narrow margin, which prompted the Islamist-rooted AKP to demand a re-run, citing what it said were voting irregularities.The High Election Board’s decision to grant that request drew sharp criticism from Turkey’s Western allies and from Erdogan’s opponents at home, stirring concerns about the rule of law and raising the stakes for the re-run.Broadcasters put the CHP’s lead on Sunday at about 800,000 votes, eclipsing the roughly 13,000-vote margin in March.The election board said it would announce the election results as soon as possible.“While March 31 was a mayoral election, this re-run was one to put an end to the dictatorship,” said Gulcan Demirkaya, 48, from the city’s AKP-leaning Kagithane district.“God willing, I would like to see (Imamoglu) as the president in five years’ time,” she said. “The one-man rule should come to an end. For the first time in a long time, I am very happy and proud for my country.”JUSTICE AND LOVEImamoglu, a former businessman and district mayor who waged an inclusive campaign and avoided criticising Erdogan, said he was ready to work with the AKP to tackle Istanbul’s problems, including its transport gridlock and the needs of its Syrian refugees.“In this new page in Istanbul, there will from now on be justice, equality, love, tolerance; while misspending (of public funds), pomp, arrogance and the alienation of the other will end,” he said.The handover of power in the mayor’s office could shed further light on what Imamoglu said was the misspending of billions of lira at the Istanbul municipality, which has a budget of around $4 billion.Erdogan himself served as Istanbul’s mayor in the 1990s before he embarked on a national political career, dominating Turkish politics first as prime minister, then as president. He presided over years of strong economic growth. But critics say he has become increasingly autocratic and intolerant of dissent.The second defeat in Istanbul marked a major embarrassment for the president and could also weaken what until recently seemed to be his iron grip on power. He had campaigned hard and targeted Imamoglu directly with accusations of lying and cheating.“This is definitely going to have an impact on the future of Turkish politics given the margin of victory. It’s an alarming sign for the AKP establishment,” said Sinan Ulgen, visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe in Brussels and a former Turkish diplomat.Analysts say the loss could set off a Cabinet reshuffle in Ankara and adjustments to foreign policy. It could even trigger a national election earlier than 2023 as scheduled, although the leader of the AKP’s nationalist ally played down that prospect.“Turkey should now return to its real agenda, the election process should close,” MHP party leader Devlet Bahceli said. “Talking of an early election would be among the worst things that can be done to our country.”Turkey’s economy is in recession and the United States, its NATO ally, has threatened sanctions if Erdogan goes ahead with plans to install Russian missile defences.The uncertainty over the fate of Istanbul and potential delays in broader economic reforms have kept financial markets on edge.Turkey’s lira currency tumbled after the decision to annul the March vote and is down nearly 10% this year in part on election jitters. It edged higher on Sunday night.WhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> SharePrintlast_img read more