LaVar Ball pulling son LaMelo out of SoCal high school

first_imgFire hits houses in Mandaluyong City MOST READ (L-R) Lavar Ball and LaMelo Ball look on from the audience during week eight of the BIG3 three on three basketball league at Staples Center on August 13, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images/AFPLOS ANGELES — LaVar Ball is pulling his 16-year-old son LaMelo out of his Southern California high school to be home schooled and so he can be made into “the best basketball player ever.”LaVar told The Los Angeles Times that LaMelo, a junior, will leave Chino Hills High School on Tuesday so he will have fewer distractions and better focus.ADVERTISEMENT Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Read Next LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary LATEST STORIES Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Cavaliers moving Love to center, Thompson to reserve role LaMelo is considered one of the nation’s top high school recruits and has committed to play at UCLA, where his brother Lonzo played last season. Lonzo is now a rookie with the Los Angeles Lakers and their brother, LiAngelo, will be a freshman at UCLA.LaMelo, who scored 92 points in a game for Chino Hills, will focus on playing for his father’s travel team, Big Baller Brand.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutLaVar has grabbed attention over the past year with exaggerated claims and headline-grabbing antics. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Police: California school shooting took 16 seconds PLAY LIST 01:42Police: California school shooting took 16 seconds03:122 dead in California school attack; gunman shoots self00:54Palace: Up to MTRCB, DFA chief to pull out ‘Abominable’ from cinemas01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City View commentslast_img read more

Red-hot Ronaldo in record-setting form for Real

first_imgCristiano Ronaldo Red-hot Ronaldo makes best start to a calendar year at Real Madrid Alberto Piñero Real Madrid correspondent Last updated 1 year ago 16:28 3/3/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(16) Cristiano Ronaldo Real Madrid Primera División Getafe Real Madrid v Getafe After a sluggish beginning to the season, the 33-year-old has hit his top level over the course of the last couple of months Cristiano Ronaldo has made his best start to a calendar year since arriving at Real Madrid by netting 12 times in the first two months of 2018.The form and longevity of the Portugal star was called into question at the start of the season, which he started slowly. Hampered by suspension, it took the 33-year-old until a December 9 rout of Sevilla to get his third goal of the league campaign.Since the winter break, the Ballon d’Or winner has set about making up for lost time, and has hit a particularly rich seam of form in recent weeks. Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player Ronaldo has scored double or better in four of his last six La Liga outings, including a hat-trick against Real Sociedad. Only Levante have managed to keep the attacker quiet during this period, in which he has scored 10 goals.Additionally, the Portuguese attacker’s double against Paris Saint-Germain helped Madrid to a 3-1 first-leg lead over the Ligue 1 leaders in the Champions League last 16.Even a forward as prolific as Ronaldo has rarely enjoyed such a prolific period, netting 1.33 goals-per-game on average since the beginning of January.It is his hottest ever start to a year at the Bernabeu. Although he scored more goals in January and February in 2013, he also played four more fixtures and therefore only struck 1.23 goals-per-game.Twelve months earlier, he matched the 12 goals he has struck this time around but had similarly played 13 times for Los Blancos in comparison to the nine outings he has had under Zinedine Zidane so far this year.Cristiano Ronaldo goal GFXRonaldo’s turnaround in form, if continued, could propel him in back into Ballon d’Or contention towards the end of the year, despite Lionel Messi having been considered the favourite after an excellent La Liga season.”I never dreamed of winning the Ballon d’Or five times,” Ronaldo said this week . “If I had to finish my career now, I would be super happy… [but] if I won another Ballon d’Or, two or three more times I’d be delighted with life.”Even if I don’t win, I’ve already won five… but I still have the confidence and the strength to compete for the prize… it depends on the titles we win this year. Everything I dreamed of, I achieved.”The news also bodes well for Portugal as they seek to upset the odds and win World Cup 2018.Ronaldo has consistently improved his output in World Cup years since moving to Spain, starting the year with just five goals in 2006 before netting six times and nine times in 2010 and 2014 respectively.last_img read more

a month ago​Nuno insists Wolves focused on Braga

first_img​Nuno insists Wolves focused on Bragaby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveNuno Espirito Santo insists that everyone at the club is focused on their next game – a Europa League tie against Braga.Wolves are suffering a dip in form, after suffering two successive defeats against Everton and Chelsea.They are in the bottom three in the Premier League, which is an unusual position considering their form last season.But Nuno thinks they must take things one game at a time in order to find their groove.”It’s the third season for us. We started in the Championship, Thursday we play Europa League, we are the same,” said Nuno to reporters.”We have to work hard, but we don’t stay too much time in the past, we just look at Thursday.”This is my job. It’s not when we win everything is OK, when we lose everything is bad.”That’s why I say we have to realise what happened.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month agoNuno deflated after Braga loss continues Wolves slump

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Nuno deflated after Braga loss continues Wolves slumpby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveWolves boss Nuno Espirito Santo disappointed after Thursday’s loss to Braga at Molineux.Ricardo Horta’s effort saw the Premier League club lose in what was their first appearance in the main stage of a European competition since 1980Speaking after the game, Nuno said: “It is difficult to break down a team. We didn’t create much but the chance they had they got it. It’s a tough game. We have to keep on going.”All the goals are mistakes. If there was perfection there would be no goals. We have to remain calm and move on.”We controlled the game and managed well but one of the things we have to improve is to be patient and find a way to break down teams. Individually and as a team we have to raise our standards again.”On Sunday we have another challenge [against Crystal Palace].” last_img read more

Video: Draymond Green Screams: “They Told Me I Can’t Play In This League” After Winning Title

first_imgDraymond Green celebrates a championship win.Draymond Green Michigan StateFormer Michigan State forward Draymond Green was certainly a force during his college days, but the Spartans star wasn’t looked at as one of the best players in the 2012 NBA Draft – mostly because teams couldn’t figure out what his natural position on the floor would be. Turns out most of those teams are now regretting passing on him. The Warriors star, who was eventually selected with the No. 35 overall pick, won a title last night after putting up a triple-double in game six of the NBA Finals. He’s one of the most versatile players in the NBA, too.After the game, Green, in celebration, was seen screaming to his mother “they told me I can’t play in this league.” It was a great redemption moment.Green is set to make some serious money this offseason. Apparently, he can play in this league.last_img read more

Frontline Raises USD 100 Mn for Fleet Expansion

first_imgzoom Tanker owner and operator Frontline has completed its share offering raising gross proceeds of USD 100 million to fund growth opportunities through vessel acquisitions.The funds, raised through the issuance of over 13.4 million of new shares, will also be used for general corporate purposes.The new shares were priced at USD 7.45 per share, the shipowner said, adding that the offering “was significantly oversubscribed.”Frontline’s largest shareholder Hemen Holding Ltd. has agreed to be allocated 1,342,281 new shares in the offering, corresponding to 10 per cent of the offering. Hemen will now own an aggregate of 82,145,703 shares in the company, around 48.4 per cent of Frontline’s shares and votes.The due date for payment for allocated new shares is expected to be December 16, 2016.Subject to full payment of the new shares, the company said that the delivery of the new shares is expected to be delivered to the subscribers and become tradable on the Oslo Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange on or about December 16, 2016.last_img read more

Amazons Echo Show smart display now in India

first_imgBengaluru: Expanding its hardware portfolio in the country, Amazon on Tuesday launched — Amazon Echo Show — its new offering in the smart display category with a 10-inch HD display, built-in smart home hub and a speaker system for Rs 22,999 in India. The smart display comes with a 5MP front camera and Dolby sound processing, the company said in a statement. “Echo Show provides an enhanced audio-visual experience. The large screen size will increase utility and make it even easier to ask Alexa to show you things,” said Parag Gupta, Head of Amazon Devices, India. Also Read – Swiggy now in 500 Indian cities, targets 100 more this year To make the device more efficient on differenciating users’ voices from the ambient sound, the company says it added an eight-microphone array and “far-field” technology. The built-in Smart Home hub would enable users to discover and set-up compatible light bulbs and plugs without the need for additional hubs or apps with a simple voice command — “Alexa, discover my devices.” In addition, the smart display also supports hands-free calling, built-in web browsers and accessibility features. “You can enable Alexa captioning, magnify the screen, toggle colour inversion, choose between colour correction options, enable the VoiceView screen reader to use gestures to navigate the screen and hear spoken feedback about the items you select,” the company added. Amazon Echo Show is available on Amazon.in with cashback and other offers.last_img read more

Revisiting The Greatest Show On Turf

Fifteen years ago, Mike Martz had a radical notion: “Why does the run have to set up the pass?”That, according to Sports Illustrated’s Peter King, was the question the new St. Louis Rams offensive coordinator posed to his head coach, Dick Vermeil, as they prepared for the coming NFL season in June 1999. It was to be Vermeil’s third in St. Louis, and judging from the press clippings, probably his last if things didn’t change in a hurry.1Things did change in a hurry, but it was still Vermeil’s last year with the team — just not for the reason fans expected before the season. Over the previous two seasons, Vermeil had coached the Rams to 23 losses and only nine wins, with an offense that ranked 23rd out of 30 NFL teams in passing efficiency and 26th in scoring.Then came Martz. “I don’t know of any assistant coach that came in, at any one time, in any one program, and made as big a contribution as Mike did at that time,” Vermeil said in a recent interview. In his estimation, Martz’s contribution to the Rams2Along with those of wide receivers coach Al Saunders, offensive line coach John Matsko, and strength coach Dana LeDuc. was equivalent to that of a first-round pick — and that’s not a hard case to make. Upon Martz’s arrival, the Rams went from laughingstocks to Super Bowl champs with an explosive attack that came to be known as the “Greatest Show on Turf.”It was, at the time, the third-most potent scoring offense and the second-most efficient passing attack3By adjusted net yards per attempt generated above league average. the league had seen in its modern incarnation.4Going back to 1970, the year of the AFL-NFL merger. And of even more historical significance, the Rams did it before the league became fixated on throwing the ball.While the longtime mantra of football coaches everywhere had been to “establish the run” before passing, Martz’s plan was to aggressively pass the ball until the Rams had a lead worth protecting with the run. Stocked with speed everywhere and willing to throw in any situation, the Greatest Show on Turf proved that pass-first teams could win championships, and it heralded the passing fireworks we see in the NFL today.“If you go back and look at the other teams of that era, the ‘conventional’ teams that you were competing with, [the Rams were] the aberration of the day,” said former Baltimore Ravens coach and current NFL Network analyst Brian Billick, whose head-coaching debut came against the Rams in their 1999 regular-season opener. “St. Louis was so far ahead. It’s hard to say [they were] ‘pass-happy’ because they actually ran the ball pretty well,” he said. “But there’s no question they wanted to throw the ball.”As Billick noted, St. Louis still could run effectively — running back Marshall Faulk racked up the NFL’s fifth-most rushing yards in 1999 — but that wasn’t the team’s focus. The Rams anticipated what statistical analysts would eventually come to learn about football: Teams run when they win; they don’t win when they run. After using all that passing to build early leads, St. Louis rushed on the league’s sixth-largest proportion of its second-half plays — and no team devoted more of its fourth-quarter plays to running the ball. Martz had successfully flipped conventional football wisdom on its head, using the pass to set up the run just as he had set out to do.And ever since the Greatest Show on Turf hit the NFL scene, the league has trended toward ever more (and more effective) passing, further enabled by rule changes designed to incentivize every team to spread the field and throw the ball aggressively.The genesis of the Rams’ aggressive strategy came when Martz was coaching quarterbacks for the Washington Redskins a year earlier. As ESPN analyst Ron Jaworski tells the story in his book “The Games That Changed The Game,” Martz realized that his pass-heavy third-down play packages were too effective to be confined to such a narrow situation.5Despite relatively average yards-per-play numbers across all situations, Washington had ranked fourth in the league in third-down conversion rate in 1997. “Since we both love these plays so much,” Martz asked head coach Norv Turner, “why can’t we run them whenever we want? Why wait till third down?”“So what happened was that we decided to run these third-and-long plays regardless of down and distance or field position,” Martz told Jaworski. “To us it simply didn’t matter anymore. This kept defenses guessing — they couldn’t zero in on our tendencies, personnel packages, or formations, because they’d always have to be ready for the big pass.”Armed with such convention-breaking ideas, Martz represented the most revolutionary branch of the coaching tree originally planted by retired San Diego Chargers coach Don Coryell. Martz’s preferred offensive system, nicknamed “Air Coryell” for its emphasis on defense-stretching pass plays, wasn’t new; as the name implied, the system was first developed by Coryell in the 1960s at San Diego State, and later used to great effect at the NFL level by the Chargers of the early ’80s.6Under the coordination of Turner, another Coryell acolyte, the Dallas Cowboys had won multiple Super Bowls running the offense in the early 1990s. But it had never been taken to the extremes Martz envisioned upon joining the Rams staff.During the 1998 season, just three teams passed on more than 50 percent of their first-down plays.7When the score was close, and filtering out late-game situations. Running the West Coast Offense under coach Mike Holmgren, the Green Bay Packers threw in a league-high 57 percent of those situations — but gained an average of only 5.8 yards per attempt.8By comparison, the league average across all passes that season was 6.8 yards. This was an artifact of the West Coast’s philosophy, which had overtaken the league in the two decades since its creation by legendary coach Bill Walsh. Similar to Coryell’s scheme, Walsh’s offense emphasized passing over rushing, but it focused on stretching the field horizontally with short passes as a means of ball control. By contrast, Martz wanted to throw early and often, but also sought to stretch the field with deep passing.“If you’ve got a Mercedes,” Martz said at the time, “you don’t keep it in the garage.”After an offseason overhaul, the Rams possessed the football equivalent of German engineering under the hood. First, they signed accurate passer Trent Green9Fresh off a career season under Martz in Washington. to conduct Martz’s mad experiment from behind center. Then, capitalizing on a brewing contract dispute with the Indianapolis Colts, St. Louis heisted Faulk in a trade, giving up just a pair of draft picks for the league’s best all-around running back. Days later, they used the sixth overall pick in the draft on Torry Holt, anticipating a productive pairing at wide receiver with former Pro Bowler Isaac Bruce returning from injury. Even the role players, such as second-year receiver Az-Zahir Hakim, had otherworldly speed.Vermeil was already a longtime Air Coryell believer,10“I had run it myself in Philadelphia on a smaller-volume scale in the late ’70s and early ’80s,” he said. and had been trying to install the offense in St. Louis for two years, but lacked the proper personnel. “We had the foundation of it, installed by [former offensive coordinator] Jerry Rhome, the first two years I was there,” Vermeil told me. “I had actually limited [the playbook’s] growth my second year there because we couldn’t complete in the high 60 percent of our throws. So I instructed people to cut back in the volume, hoping that we could improve the execution and the completion percentage.”With Martz, Faulk, Bruce, Green and Holt in place, such cutbacks were no longer necessary. In the preseason of 1999, Green completed 28 of 32 passes (88 percent) before suffering a season-ending knee injury in the team’s third game. When unheralded backup Kurt Warner stepped in, Vermeil said, Martz and the coaching staff “made no adjustments” to the offensive scheme.True to Vermeil’s expectations, Warner ended up completing 65.1 percent of his passes, which at the time was the third-best single-season completion percentage by any quarterback ever.11Among quarterbacks with 450 attempts. In addition, the Rams came within striking distance of the 1989 San Francisco 49ers’ mark for the NFL’s second-most efficient passing offense since the merger12Relative to league average.More importantly, the Rams proved that a team could win without establishing the ground game before unleashing holy terror through the air. On first downs,13Again, when the score was close, and filtering out late-game situations. St. Louis passed a league-high 59 percent of the time, and gained 7.6 yards per attempt on those throws (11 percent more than the NFL average on all attempts that year) and scored a touchdown on 7.4 percent of them (almost twice the league average across all attempts). On the whole, the Rams passed 5.4 percent more than would be expected from their +9.1 average in-game scoring margin — still the biggest disparity by any Super Bowl winner since the merger.“The spread-out type of system, it really did begin with them, because they were so explosive,” Billick told me. “It was a little bit different [from their contemporaries], but they were very successful with it. Kurt Warner made it work, and they spread you out in a way that very few teams could spread you out — that looks, today, very familiar.”Although no one knew it at the time, the Rams were at the leading edge of something that was about to take over pro football. The NFL’s average passer rating in 1999 was 75.1 — essentially the same as it had been for a decade — and Warner’s 109.2 rate led the league by a mile. It was, at the time, the second-highest single-season mark ever. Within five years, though, the league-average rating had eclipsed 80.0 for the first time ever, with two players14Peyton Manning and Daunte Culpepper. surpassing Warner’s rating from 1999. By last season, the average NFL passer rating was 84.1, with Warner’s 1999 mark dropping to 10th all time. Because of their sheer effectiveness, pass-first offensive philosophies have gone from the vanguard (see Coryell’s Chargers, or the various Run-and-Shoot teams of the ’90s) to commonplace over the last 15 years.The conventional narrative is that Bill Belichick’s New England Patriots finally solved Martz’s offense in Super Bowl XXXVI, limiting the Rams to 17 points by making Faulk a non-factor. But St. Louis still moved the ball well in the loss, amassing 427 total yards while Faulk notched 130 yards from scrimmage.15In other words, if not for three turnovers, the Rams would likely have won another Super Bowl in 2002. And after a disastrous 7-9 season in 2002, a reloaded version of the Greatest Show on Turf emerged behind another obscure QB (Marc Bulger) to tie for second in the NFL in scoring during the 2003 season.16Ranking behind only Vermeil and Green’s Kansas City Chiefs. The true end came later, as the Rams’ talent scattered. Faulk retired in 2006, while Bruce, Holt and All-Decade left tackle Orlando Pace donned unfamiliar uniforms in their twilight years. Martz took his system to Detroit, San Francisco and Chicago, garnering mixed reviews when lesser talents were plugged in.To the coaches, then, the Greatest Show on Turf was really about the perfect marriage of a high-powered strategy and a gifted roster.“This game has been, is now, and always will be about talent,” Billick said. “Taking nothing away from the system, you’re talking about Hall of Famers like Marshall Faulk, Kurt Warner — who I believe will be in the Hall of Fame — the talents of an Isaac Bruce and Torry Holt … These were unique talents that the system adapted to very, very well.”Vermeil concurred. “Very few teams ever have that kind of skill, at one time, on their side of the line of scrimmage,” he said.It was those players who allowed Martz’s progressive game-planning to thrive, and it was his system that showcased their skills. His fingerprints can still be seen on the league 15 years later.Thanks to Grantland’s Chris Brown for help with this article. read more

How To Fix The Extra Point

For several years, NFL higher-ups have been a bit sour on the extra point. It slows down the game; kickers make them so often that they’re not really exciting, or even tense; and even if one is missed, it’s less “OMG, did you see that?” and more “WTF, kickers are terrible!”In preseason games, the NFL has experimented with narrowing the goal posts and/or moving back the spot of the kick on attempts. It is rumored to be considering eliminating the extra-point option entirely.That’s one way to encourage two-point conversions. But it’s not as exciting as the idea that the Indianapolis Colts are offering. This week, the Colts caused some buzz by making a crazy-sounding suggestion to the NFL’s competition committee: If a team converted its two-point attempt, it would get a shot at an additional point by attempting a 50-yard field goal.Considering that kickers now make 50-yard attempts about two-thirds of the time, this essentially means that successful two-point tries would be worth 2.66 points. That would clearly affect coaches’ strategy after a touchdown — or at least it should. Currently, a team needs to be able to convert a two-point attempt 50 percent of the time to make it a better option (barring tactical reasons) than an extra point. But in the Colts’ extra-extra-point scenario, a team would only have to convert its two-point attempt from scrimmage about 38 percent of the time.In 2014, teams made 48 percent of their attempts, which is just about in line with how they’ve done for the past decade. So under the proposed change, going for two would probably be right in most circumstances. (That’s a small sample size, though. It’s unclear exactly how good teams really are at converting two-point attempts because they are taken so rarely and teams don’t take them with equal frequency.)Even if the Colts’ rule came to be — and that’s a very unlikely prospect — the coaches wouldn’t necessarily catch on even though the math would be in their favor. Many coaches still kick field goals on fourth and goal from the 1, and that is generally a much worse mistake.But suppose for a second that the strategy did catch on. It would likely have a big ripple effect. Having a kicker who can convert from 50 yards consistently would become a lot more valuable. Also, knowing that teams could come back from nine points down on a single possession might make coaches play more aggressively in a number of different situations.The competition committee has already rejected the idea, meaning that it’s unlikely to be adopted any time soon. (It will still be offered up to the owners next week, but without the committee’s endorsement.) But that leaves room for my alternative: How about any time that a team converts a 2-pointer, it can either take the two points or take one point and try again? Then no lead would be safe. read more

This Years Kentucky Team Is More Dominant Than Indianas Undefeated 1976 Squad

We also did a bit more data entry from those NCAA.org scans of old team stat sheets to compare Indiana’s core stats with Kentucky’s. Our former ESPN colleague Dean Oliver, now with the Sacramento Kings, developed four factors to describe teams’ style of play. We estimated these for Indiana,4We had to guess what share of its and its opponents’ rebounds came on the offensive side of the floor, because offensive and defensive rebounds weren’t listed separately in the stat sheets that year. To that end, we estimated from trends in recent college data (paywalled) and in the NBA that 35 percent of rebounds by Indiana and its opponents were of the offensive variety. and we also computed each undefeated team’s pace of play and its points scored and allowed per 100 possessions.Indiana was better than Kentucky in a few ways: It allowed fewer points per possession, shot for a slightly higher effective field goal percentage, forced a greater rate of turnovers and allowed slightly fewer free-throw attempts per shot from the floor. But in every other respect, and every net measure, the Wildcats best the Hoosiers.Of course, Kentucky is trying to finish as undefeated champion in 2015 — it’s not chasing the 1975-76 Hoosiers or perfection. Or, as Kentucky coach John Calipari keeps emphasizing to the media when they ask about his team’s quest to finish 40-0, “We know we’re not perfect. We’re undefeated, but we’re not perfect.” The coach is right, and he’d be just as correct if he were describing the 1975-76 Hoosiers.Both the 2014-15 Wildcats and the 1975-76 Hoosiers are great teams — probably among the 25 best teams relative to their competition in the last 40 years of men’s college basketball. But neither team ranks as the best in recent decades. What sets apart Kentucky and Indiana is that they managed to win all their close games and remain undefeated. Indiana won two games in overtime, and five more by five points or fewer. Kentucky has also won two OT games, and two other games by five points or fewer. Each team played nailbiters against Notre Dame: Indiana won by three on Dec. 11, 1975, while Kentucky won by two on Saturday to advance to this weekend’s Final Four in Indianapolis.We have reliable SRS data going back to 1985. Eight teams rank ahead of this season’s Kentucky squad, including two previous Kentucky teams: the 1996 two-loss champs, and the 1997 national runners-up. Those 1997 Wildcats — along with the No. 1 team on our list, the 1999 runners-up, the Duke Blue Devils — provide a warning to this year’s Kentucky squad that the best team usually doesn’t win the NCAA tournament. Even among the eight teams of the last 30 years that were more dominant than Kentucky has been so far this year, just two won the title. Kentucky has to win two more games to become the first undefeated national champion since Indiana in 1975-76. And if the Wildcats succeed, the stats we have suggest that they’re a notch or two more dominant than those Hoosiers were.Getting data on Kentucky is easy: The Wildcats’ every game has a digital box score that’s been compiled and analyzed by the likes of Ken Pomeroy and our own March Madness predictions. But Indiana’s statistical record from its undefeated season remains in the analog age, locked in scans of stat sheets.To truly measure the 32-0 Hoosiers’ greatness, we’d want to compile the schedule and results of every Division I team that year. Unfortunately, that would involve inputting dozens of data points from hundreds of image files. And our favorite speed typist was busy.1Seriously, we asked him. So we simplified our analysis: We entered the scores of every Indiana game, then adjusted the Hoosiers’ average margin of victory by the average margin of victory of each of its opponents that season.2Accounting for home-court advantage. That gave us an estimate of Indiana’s Simple Rating System scores, which otherwise aren’t available for teams that far back.3We checked how well this technique estimates SRS for teams from the Big Ten — Indiana’s conference — and the SEC — Kentucky’s — for more recent seasons. We found it’s very reliable, with an r-squared of 0.96 against actual SRS for seasons since 1984-85. The distribution of its errors is approximately normal, with mean of zero and a standard deviation of 1.26, allowing us to create a confidence interval around its predictions and estimate the likelihood that Indiana’s true SRS was greater than or less than the known SRS ratings of more modern teams.What we found is that Kentucky has been slightly better, relative to its opposition, than Indiana was. Kentucky’s SRS is 29.05, meaning it would beat an average team on a neutral floor by about 29 points. Indiana’s estimated SRS is 27.49. Though that’s just an estimate, we can be fairly confident — about 90% sure — that Kentucky is the more dominant team. (Again, these are estimates only relative to the average team each season — the question of which team would win head-to-head is an entirely different one.) read more