TNT draws first blood

first_imgWorld’s 50 Best Restaurants launches new drinking and dining guide Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken MOST READ With a 1-0 lead after a 109-105 win on Saturday, Victolero wants his Hotshots to stay the course knowing that the Beermen will do everything to bounce back in their 7 p.m. clash at MoA Arena.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games What ‘missteps’? View comments Alcantara, pal sweep futures WATCH: Firefighters rescue baby seal found in parking garagecenter_img 1 dead in Cavite blast, fire PBA IMAGESTNT KaTropa maximized the advantage it has—a 6-foot-10 behemoth in Joshua Smith—and reversed all pre-series predictions that it was the underdog against Barangay Ginebra.Smith came off the bench and threw his weight around all night long, keying a 100-94 decision of the top-seeded Gin Kings as the Texters broke the ice in their best-of-five Final Four match-up in the PBA Commissioner’s Cup before a stunned pro-Ginebra crowd at Mall of Asia Arena on Sunday night.ADVERTISEMENT Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Scoring at will and changing every Ginebra shot inside, Smith was the immovable force in the middle for the Texters that the Gin Kings didn’t have an answer to as TNT goes into Game 2 knowing that it put a dent on the psyche of the enemy—critical in a short series.“We hope that Joshua continues to play the same,” TNT coach Nash Racela, who was brilliant in drawing the game plan that had Smith scoring in the 30s for the second straight night. “But the locals will still be crucial.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutIt was clear that Racela would ride Smith all the way, as he managed his import’s minutes splendidly by, first, not starting him and then pulling him in and out of the floor to keep Smith fresh for the stretch.Smith, who came in as TNT’s third import here, finished with 35 points and 13 rebounds in less than 29 minutes. Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games The locals backed Smith up with aplomb, with RR Pogoy shooting 17 and Ranidel de Ocampo firing 12. But the biggest shot among locals came from Jason Castro, who sealed the outcome with a triple with 12.2 seconds left for what turned out to be the final score.That was the only field goal for Asia’s best point guard, as he struggled to get into a rhythm all night but saved his only basket when it truly mattered.Justin Brownlee paced the Kings with 24 points, with LA Tenorio and Japeth Aguilar shooting 15 apiece.Game 2 is slated Tuesday night also at MoA Arena.Meawnhile, Chito Victolero has described Star’s Final Four with powerhouse San Miguel Beer in just one word: Grinding.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

Halas West honored for Best Discovery of 2003

first_imgBy varying the relative size of the glass core and the gold shell layer, researchers can “tune” nanoshells to respond to different wavelengths of light. Nanotechnology Now covers basics, news, and general information regarding nanotechnology, nanosciences, and molecular manufacturing, with reporting on disruptive technologies such as MEMS, NEMS, Nanoscale Materials, Molecular Manufacturing, Quantum Computing, Nanomedicine, Nanoelectronics, Nanotubes, Self Assembly, and Molecular Biology. Invented by Halas in 1998, nanoshells are a new class of multi-layered nanoscale particle that have unique optical properties that are controlled by the thickness and composition of their constituent layers. In form, nanoshells resemble malted milk balls, but the coating is gold instead of chocolate, and the center is a sphere of glass. Just 100 nanometers in diameter, nanoshells are about 20 times smaller than a red blood cell. For more on the Nanotechnology Now “Best Discovery of 2003” award, see: http://nanotech-now.com/2003-Awards/Best-Discoveries-2003.htm ShareCONTACT: Jade Boyd PHONE: (713) 348-6778 EMAIL: jadeboyd@rice.eduHALAS, WEST HONORED FOR “BEST DISCOVERY OF 2003” Rice University researchers honored by Web site Nanotechnology Now For biomedical applications, nanoshells can be designed and fabricated to specifically absorb near infrared light. A region of the spectrum just beyond the visible range, near infrared light is optimal for medical imaging and treatment because it passes harmlessly through soft tissue. “We read about and report on them every day, 365 days a year,” said Nanotechnology Now Editor Rocky Rawstern. “By interviewing and speaking with them, and covering their news, opinions, discoveries, triumphs and failures, we have come to appreciate a few above the rest. Selected from the whole, the ones we’ve chosen as the Best of 2003 represent a small fraction of the tens of thousands of participants in the nanospace.”center_img Halas, the Stanley C. Moore Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Professor of Chemistry, and West, associate professor of both bioengineering and chemical engineering, were honored for their groundbreaking work to develop a cancer therapy based upon metallic nanoshells. For the past six years, the team at Nanotechnology Now has tracked the thousands of Web sites, individuals, businesses, and government and educational institutions that exist in the nanospace. Unlike drug-based cancer therapies, the photothermal treatment of cancer relies on the basic physics of light. By shining near infrared light on gold nanoshells, researchers can generate enough heat to burst the wall of cells. The light itself is invisible and harmless, and because the heating is very localized, it only affects cells immediately adjacent to the nanoshells. Rice University engineering researchers Naomi Halas and Jennifer West have been awarded “Best Discovery of 2003” by Nanotechnology Now , the world’s leading nanotechnology news and information site. Clinical trials have yet to begin for a nanoshell-based cancer therapy, but Halas and West’s preliminary work on the therapy was recognized in July 2003 by the Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Breast Cancer Research Program. The program awarded Halas its Innovator Award, complete with a $3 million, four-year grant. AddThislast_img read more