FL deputies injured in shootout over Amazon Alexa

first_imgTwo Pasco County Sheriff deputies were shot after responding to domestic violence call early Saturday morning in New Port Richey, Florida.Deputies were called to the scene around 12:30 a.m. after officials say the couple’s daughter called 911 claiming that Terrance J. Peterson, 62,  got into an argument with his wife and shot at the wife’s Amazon Alexa.Peterson then engaged in a stand-off with authorities by barricading himself in the house for several hours before firing multiple rounds at deputies who entered the home, police say.Around 4:00 a.m. deputies began deploying gas, and sent a SWAT robot in and found Peterson with a wound to his head.Deputies did not confirm if the injury was self-inflicted or due to exchange in gunfire.“This was a battle. This was an absolute gun battle. And the deputies’ heroism was second to none,” Sheriff Chris Nocco said.In addition to the two injured officers, “several sheriff vehicles were struck by gunfire, as well as neighboring homes,” Nocco said.Peterson is facing five counts of attempted homicide and a domestic battery charge.He was psychologically evaluated before taken into custody.last_img read more

Steely Serena in ‘different space’, ready for record Slam win – coach

first_img“Having a baby is a big thing. So for a top-level athlete to come back and be 100 percent fit after having a baby any time, I think there was not enough time.“So I think now she’s ready physically. I think emotionally too because it’s a big change in anyone’s life to have a baby and you need to get used to a new life, and it took a bit of time.“But I feel now she’s back to being Serena on both the physical and emotional side. So I think her level is good. I think she needed a big fight, and it happened (against Halep) and I think it’s a great thing,” he added.Williams, seeded just 16, beat world number one Halep 6-1, 4-6, 6-4, repelling a gutsy fightback from the Romanian after blitzing her in the first set.She next plays seventh seed Karolina Pliskova for a place in the semi-finals, where she could meet either Osaka or sixth seed Elina Svitolina.Asked if the 37-year-old could go on and win her eighth title in Melbourne to match Court’s long-standing record, Mouratoglou replied: “Of course I believe she will win.“First of all, I always think she can win, and she will win. I think I should be in that state of mind. Because she’s Serena.”Share on: WhatsApp FILE PHOTO; Serena WilliamsMelbourne, Australia | AFP | Serena Williams is emotionally and physically ready to win another Grand Slam, unlike during her famous meltdown in the final of the US Open last year, according to coach Patrick Mouratoglou.The 37-year-old American stormed past top seed Simona Halep to reach the quarter-finals at the Australian Open on Monday, with the Romanian saying it felt like being “hit by a train”.Long-time coach Mouratoglou said Williams was in a different space to the one she occupied at Flushing Meadows, when she controversially lost the decider to Naomi Osaka during her comeback from having a baby.In that match, Williams lost the plot, receiving a code violation for coaching, a penalty point for racquet abuse and a game penalty for calling the umpire a “liar” and a “thief”.Mouratoglou admitted “I don’t think she was ready” to win a final back then.“There is a big difference between reaching a final and winning it,” he added.But four months on from that chapter of her life that Williams now refuses to talk about, he said she was “back to being Serena”.“I think she’s fitter than she was last year, because even though she made really a lot of efforts to come back in shape last year, I don’t think she had enough time,” he said.last_img read more

Bloodsport

first_imgAs I sit here at my computer on this very dreary Martin Luther King Jr. Day, I am in a semi-fog in regards to the importance of wins and losses in the sports world. There is a tragedy, an almost unimaginable tragedy that has occurred in the Western Hemisphere. Yes I am talking about the almost “genocidal” non-response to the “army” of “grim reapers” that has invaded the small impoverished Afro-Caribbean country to the south of America, Haiti. The monumental loss of life is a burden unto itself and overwhelming but the response by the African-American community, particularly affluent Black athletes in the NFL, MLB and the NBA has been very “underwhelming.” The Afrocentric athletes from other countries and cultures take the economic and social impact of games and sports, very seriously.Everyone, at least a significant percentage of Black folk seem to be going “Lady Gaga” over a few “insensitive remarks that the CBN right-winger and so-called preacher and part-time politician Pat Robertson made in response to the horrific situation in Haiti.Robertson said in a nutshell that “something happened a long time ago in Haiti and people might not want to talk about it. They were under the heel of the French. Napoleon the Third and whatever. And they got together and swore a pact to the devil. They said, ‘We will serve you if you get us free from the prince.’ True story.” And so the devil said, “OK, it’s a deal.” They kicked the French out, the Haitians revolted and got themselves free. But ever since, they have been cursed by one thing after the other and desperately poor.That island of Hispaniola is one island. It’s cut down the middle, on the one side is Haiti, on the other side is the Dominican Republic. The Dominican Republic is prosperous, healthy, full of resorts, etc. Haiti is in desperate poverty. Same island.Because there are no living Haitians to confirm their country’s alleged past pact with the devil it is difficult to corroborate or dispute Robertson’s statement.Please indulge me for a few moments while I kick it seriously with you, ladies and gents.One of the prime reasons that Haiti sits on the bottom of the economic pyramid in the Western Hemisphere is because they lack basic commodities of value that they can sell and they rarely take advantage of any opportunities that may be occasionally available to them. However, the most visible commodity exported from the Dominican Republic is baseball players.There was an article published on CBS-sports.com titled “Baseball: a Dominican cash crop.”It said “In this impoverished country the single-minded dedication to sports has paid off for many like native Dominican Sammy Sosa and Dominican-American Alex Rodriguez.“There are a lot of things we don’t produce in this corner of the Caribbean,” said Enrique Emilio Cordova, a local baseball historian. “We don’t produce much grain, we don’t have much industry. But every year we have a harvest of excellent ball players.” Dominicans outnumber any nationality other than U.S. citizens in the Major League system. Baseball not only is the national pastime, it’s an important bragging point, a crucial economic activity and a strong component of Dominican nationalism.”“The government is strongly linked to the sport of baseball,” said Cesar Cedeno, the cabinet-level secretary of sports. “What our baseball stars do to uphold and promote the country’s image, if we had to pay for that, the price would be immeasurable.”Have the Dominicans sold their soul to the devil so that a few of their young men can become rich and prosperous?Why aren’t more Black athletes giving back more of their time and money to urban America and why aren’t they trying to create and maintain positive public images as opposed to shooting themselves, and bringing guns into locker rooms?In 2009-2010 the collective payroll of the NFL was more than $6 billion (CBS sports.com). The percentage of Black athletes in the league in the last few years has hovered around 75 percent. Based on the number of players in the league and their salaries, theoretically at least Black players should reap around $4.5 billion of the windfall. If they put just 10 percent of those dollars back into the community, our inner cities could possibly benefit to the tune of between $250-300 million. I don’t even want to get into the salaries of Black players in the NBA and MLB. We do not have enough space here.On Dec. 31, 1972 Pittsburgh Pirates outfielder the late, great Roberto Clemente, died in a plane crash in route to deliver supplies to earthquake victims in Nicaragua. His body was never recovered but he died honorably attempting to help others.In times of need Black athletes and Black people must get up, put up and shut up. We must stop being the borrowers and become the lenders because the best commodity that we have to offer to the world is ourselves. (Aubrey Bruce can be reached at: abruce@newpittsburghcourier.com.)last_img read more