Sanders to run for re-election

first_imgSanders to run for re-electionBy Timothy McQuistonBernie Sanders has announced that he will run for re-election to a fifth term in Congress, rather than run for the open governor’s seat.Sanders said at a press conference on November 6 that though he indeed would want to be governor, the pressing needs in Washington, especially after the September 11 terrorist attacks, led him to seek re-election to “a job I love.”Sanders has run for governor three times, the last in 1986 when he was still mayor of Burlington.“It’s just not something I can undertake at this time,” Sanders said, thus ending speculation that he might run for the state’s top post. The congressman said he made the final decision the previous weekend.Along with the terrorist attacks and their aftermath, like the anthrax attacks and war in Afghanistan, Sanders cited other pressing issues that compelled him to stay on Capitol Hill: the economic recession; growing unemployment; and the failure of Congress to renew the Northeast Dairy Compact.Sanders also reiterated his strong objection to many of the Bush Administration policies before and, especially, after September 11, of which he believes President Bush is taking political advantage. Sanders cited legislation that, on the one hand, damages civil liberties, while on the other gives economic benefits to the wealthy, neither of which have anything to do with combating terrorism.Sanders, wearing an American flag pin on his lapel, also noted that a lot of the new heros of the nation aren’t movie stars or politicians, they are working people like the firefighters who climbed the stairs of the World Trade Towers, and police officers and postal workers, who provide a public service everyday.With his step-daughter, Carina Driscoll, representing his campaign office and running the press conference, and his wife, Jane Sanders, sitting behind him, a packed conference room at his Burlington office heard a confident Sanders state in that familiar Brooklyn baritone: “I’m proud, very, very proud to represent Vermont in Congress.”Given his track record, he should have little trouble convincing Vermont voters to send him back to Washington on his 61st birthday next November 11.last_img read more

Wilson

first_imgWolf Multimedia Studio of Jericho, Vermont has recently completed a video DVD entitled Wilson “Snowflake” Bentley, Snowflakes in Motion. With Musical contributions by Vermont musicians The Samples and Stowe musician Bill Bischak, and narrations by Jericho residents Wayne Howe and Dick Squires, this DVD takes the viewer into the life of Wilson Bentley. Wilson Bentley was the first person to photograph snowflakes with a microscope in 1885 and is credited with the discovery that no two snowflakes are alike! Bentley also photographed frost, dew, clouds and his family and neighbors.This DVD tells Bentley’s story of determination, passion and persistence, despite setbacks and ridicule, through the love and fascination with nature, told in Bentley’s own word’s and pictures, in a 20 minute biographical piece. The remaining 40 minutes takes viewers into the amazing world of Bentley’s images, showing intricate detailed nature shots as well as the fabulous designs and shapes of snow crystals. Backed by 8 original compositions and 2 selections from the nationally renowned band, The Samples, the 10 segments are meant to relax the viewer and build upon the thoughts that Bentley puts forth in his writings. Each piece is preceded by a quote of Bentley to set the mood for each segment:”The snow crystals . . . come to us not only to reveal the wondrous beauty of the minute in Nature, but to teach us that all earthly beauty is transient and must soon fade away. But though the beauty of the snow is evanescent, like the beauties of the autumn, as of the evening sky, it fades but to come again”Wolf Multimedia Studio, based in Jericho, Vermont since 1989, also produced the award winning Wilson Bentley Digital Archives interactive CD-ROM in 2000, containing over 1000 of Wilson Bentley’s images. The CD-ROM also contains articles written by and about Bentley, the only film of Bentley at work, games and much more.The Snowflakes in Motion DVD and more information on Bentley & the DVD are available at the Snowflake Bentley website: snowflakebentley.com, vermontsnowflakes.com and wolf1.comlast_img read more

Governor calls emergency dairy summit

first_img### WHEN:      Tuesday, June 13, 2006,12:00 p.m. Roger Allbee, director of Farm Service Agency said preliminary estimatesof crop loss approach twenty million dollars.  This number will be updated ascounties continue to assess the damage. Burlington, Vt.-Governor Jim Douglas has announcedthat his administration, working with the Vermont Milk Commission, is organizing an Emergency Dairy Summit to discuss all availablemeans to help farmers in the near term so that they can weather what theGovernor calls a ‘perfect storm’ of circumstances. WHERE:    Universityof Vermont, WatermanBuilding, Burlington This morning Governor Douglas also signed a letter to U.S. Agriculture SecretaryMike Johanns requesting Emergency Disaster Designation, which paves the way fordirect financial relief for farmers.  “Our Agency of Agriculture willwork with USDA’s Farm Service Agency to complete the paperwork and damageassessments necessary to carry out this request,” Douglassaid.center_img Governor Douglas to Call Emergency Dairy SummitAlso Seeks Federal Emergency Relief “Low milk prices, high fuel and energy cost and poor crop, or insome cases destroyed crops, due to extended spring rains are contributing towhat is now a clear crisis situation for Vermont’sdairy farmers,” Governor Douglas said.  “Because of this perfectstorm of events, I have directed my Secretary of Administration, Mike Smith towork closely with my entire cabinet in coordination with our partners in thefederal government and Vermont’scongressional delegation to provide assistance to all Vermont farmers.”  WHAT:      Governorto Call Emergency Dairy Summit Jason GibbsGovernorsCommunications Director109 State Street ¨ The Pavilion ¨ Montpelier,VT 05609-0101 ¨ www.vermont.gov/governor(link is external)Telephone: 802.828.3333 ¨ Fax: 802.828.3339 ¨ TDD: 802.828.3345last_img read more

Energy Saving Pioneer Resumes Operations in Brattleboro

first_imgEnergy Saving Pioneer Resumes OperationsBrattleboro, Vermont – November 10, 2008 – Window Quilt, the company that developed movable window insulation 30 years ago, is now shipping high performance insulated shades from their new Brattleboro factory. The company, whose products dramatically reduce energy losses through windows, was founded in Brattleboro. A local entrepreneur recently acquired the business, which had been moved to Seattle, Washington several years ago by its last corporate ownership, and returned it to Brattleboro under the direction of experienced management.The company reports tremendous response from users, energy auditors and dealers, all of whom had been very disappointed by the previous owner’s decision to close the operation. “I have never seen interest this high in my 15 years’ on and off experience with Window Quilt,” says Bryan Wittler, the company’s General Manager. “Thanks to excellent support from Brattleboro Development Credit Corp and enthusiastic pro bono assistance from several former managers, we have made great progress in preparing to meet the strong demand we anticipate in coming years. And our location in Brattleboro Development’s Book Press building is ideal, because there is almost unlimited room for future expansion.”Over a half million Window Quilts have been installed in residences, schools, national parks, and public buildings of all kinds. Window Quilt’s seasonal peak employment reached over 120 individuals during the energy conscious early 1980’s. “The need for energy saving products is greater than ever today and Window Quilts are still the most cost effective and easily deployed solution bar none,” says Larry Digney, the new owner. “The marketing possibilities for this product are immense. Our job is to make the newcomers to the field aware that 30% or more of the energy required to heat a building can be saved with our well-designed movable window insulation. Window Quilt ought to be a growing business for years to come.”Window Quilts, though simple in appearance, are highly engineered to address all the mechanisms that contribute to heat loss from the building envelope and discomfort in the interior space. The product incorporates a full perimeter seal and five-layer fabric with vapor barrier to provide insulation, block convection currents, and eliminate outside air infiltration. The company reports that in addition to the potential 30% reduction in energy consumption, rooms are more comfortable at lower thermostat settings because the shades block the radiation of body heat to the window and eliminate drafts caused by convection currents and infiltration of outside air.Window Quilts are available through specialty dealers who perform measurement and installation services, and are also available for direct purchase on the web to accommodate areas that don’t yet have a local dealer. Complete information is found at the company’s web site,.last_img read more

Leahy brings Senate panel to Vermont to focus on crime solutions

first_imgSenator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) will chair a field hearing of the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday, March 22, in Barre, Vermont. The hearing will examine the effective efforts of Barre and surrounding communities in fighting drug-related crime. Leahy has invited the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, R. Gil Kerlikowske the nation s drug czar to testify at the hearing. Kerlikowske is the former police chief in Seattle, and has almost 40 years of law enforcement experience. Judiciary Committee Member Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.), a former prosecutor, will also attend.Leahy chairs the Senate panel, and noticed the hearing on Effective Community Efforts to Counter Drug-Related Crime in Rural America on Friday. Leahy has been a long-time leader in Congress on efforts to assist state and local law enforcement, as well as community-based efforts to prevent and address crime. This is the third in a series of hearings on drug crime that Leahy has brought to Vermont. He has twice brought the Judiciary Committee to Vermont to hear firsthand about the successful efforts communities have made to address drug-related crime. The hearings, which were held in Rutland and St. Albans, helped to strengthen community resolve to address the problem of drug-related crime, and highlighted successful community-wide efforts to take on this difficult issue. In Vermont, we have felt the presence of drug abuse and drug-related crimes in our communities. The myth persists that these are only big-city problems, but rural America is also coping with these issues, said Leahy. As we learned in Rutland and St. Albans, communities are developing innovative and effective ways to combat crime, and communities across the country can learn from their successes. Vermonters in Barre and the surrounding communities have similarly pulled together to face this serious problem, and I believe this hearing will help other small towns across the country learn from their successes.Leahy has advocated a three-pronged approach to combating rising crime levels in America prevention, treatment and enforcement. He has invited local and state officials to testify, as well as community leaders and advocates. Barre Mayor Tom Lauzon will offer testimony at the hearing.Witnesses who will testify with Director Kerlikowske at the March 22 hearing include:* Col. Tom L Esperance, Vermont State Police Commander* Barbara Floersch, Associate Director of the Washington County Youth Service Bureau/Boys & Girls Club* *Susan, Graduate of the Vermont Works for Women s Modular Home Construction Program at Northwest State Correctional Facility* Damartin Quadros, Community business ownerThe hearing will be held Monday, March 22, at 9:30 a.m., at the Barre City Auditorium, 20 Auditorium Hill, Barre, Vermont.# # # # #**Name has been changed to protect witness identityNOTICE OF COMMITTEE FIELD HEARINGThe Senate Committee on the Judiciary has scheduled a hearing on Effective Community Efforts to Counter Drug-Related Crime in Rural America for Monday, March 22, 2010 at 9:30 a.m. in the Barre City Auditorium in Barre, Vermont.By order of the Chairman.# # # # #Source: Leahy’s office. 3.12.2010last_img read more

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont donates $150,000 to flood relief efforts

first_imgBlue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont,Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont announced today that it will contribute $150,000 to support relief activities for Vermonters who suffered losses as a result of flooding due to Hurricane Irene. ‘Our state has suffered a disaster of historic proportions, but Vermonters have responded with extraordinary compassion and support for those who have suffered the most because of the terrible flooding that occurred,’ said BCBSVT President and CEO Don George. ‘As the state’s only Vermont-based health plan, it is important to BCBSVT and to its more than 340 employees to do as much as we can to support our neighbors in the difficult weeks and months ahead.’ Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont, a non-profit company located in the central Vermont community of Berlin, will donate $150,000 to the Vermont Disaster Relief Fund. The Fund, created by the United Ways of Vermont in cooperation with the executive board of the Vermont Voluntary Organizations Action in Disaster and Vermont Emergency Management, is earmarked to support the long term needs of those most affected by the flooding. George said the donation is unprecedented for BCBSVT, but was decided upon because of the breadth of the losses that occurred because of Hurricane Irene-related flooding and the unique challenges faced by those who lost their homes and belongings. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is the state’s only Vermont-based health insurer and is the largest private health plan in Vermont.  The non-profit company employs more than 340 people and provides health care benefits for more than 160,000 Vermonters.  More information about Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is available on the Internet at www.bcbsvt.com(link is external)   Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is an independent corporation operating under a license with the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an association of independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans.last_img read more

Vermont Foliage Report: Near-peak to full color arrives in Northeast Kingdom

first_imgFor more information, visit www.VermontVacation.com(link is external). The foliage change appeared to slow to a near standstill during the misty, atmospheric weather of this past weekend.  But with a frosty night or two before the coming weekend and sunny weather forecast through Monday, near-peak to full color change is expected along the spine of the Green Mountains and will begin to emerge in the mountain valleys. Ray Toolan, who reports from Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom, observes a variety of foliage in the area. ‘Not a great deal of change from last week, most likely due to the wet weather. Still, we have a lot of variation, with the best colors in the higher elevations and around swamps and wetlands. In many places mid-slope forests are still in early stages while other areas are at or just past peak. Pretty much any of the paved roads in Lamoille and Orleans counties are showing nice color,’ Toolan says. Elsewhere, expect various stages of color across the state, including the mountain and river valleys where the foliage change ranges from early to mid-stage. The foothills east and south of Burlington are at mid-stage, reports Forester Keith Thompson. ‘The highlights are Jericho, Underhill and Huntington. It’s not as far along near the lake,’ Thompson says. ‘Overall a full array of vibrant fall colors are popping out from Middlebury Gap south to Killington, Bridgewater south to Ludlow, and Rutland south to Mt. Taber,’  reports spotter Tom Olson from the Maple Museum. The cooler temperatures are also moving the color change in the lower Champlain Valley and the foothills of the Taconic and Green Mountains into mid-stage, while the red maples in marshy areas are nearing peak. ‘Look for brilliant shades of red, yellow and gold in these areas,’ says Olson. In southern Vermont mid-stage color predominates along the higher elevations while the early stages prevail in the valleys where swampy areas are splashed with the crimson of red maples. For current road conditions and detailed planning information, please check our frequently updated map:  http://www.vermontvacation.com/vtopenforbusiness.htm(link is external) Best Bets: In northern Vermont, recommended scenic routes for peak color viewing include Route 114 between Lyndonville and Norton, Route 58 from Irasburg to Montgomery Center, Route 105 from North Troy to East Charleston, and Route 102 along the Connecticut River. Also try Route 302 east from Barre or Route 232 through the Groton State Forest; Route 2 between Marshfield and Lunenburg, Route 215 in Cabot, and Route 15 between Walden and Cambridge. Also, try back roads in Burke, Peacham, Barnet and Danville, which offer a variety of close-up and long-range views. Vistas from Interstate 89 from South Royalton to Richmond offer . Colorful foliage can also be seen on Route 108 between Stowe and Cambridge, Route 100 between Warren and Stowe, and Route 12 between Montpelier and Elmore. In the area around Rutland mid-stage color is emerging along Routes 7 (Middlebury to Rutland), 30 (Sudbury to Cornwall) and 4 (Rutland to Castleton). Mid-stage to near-peak foliage color is showing at higher elevations: Route 4 west from West Bridgewater to Killington and Sherburne Pass (including the Killington Ski Area Access Rd); Route 103 north from Ludlow to Route 7; Route 140 west from Mt. Holly to Wallingford and Middletown Springs. In southern Vermont where the foliage change ranges from early to mid-stage, suggested drives include Route 11 between Peru and Chester, Route 30 between Winhall and Newfane, Route 7A between Manchester and Bennington, Route 35 from Townshend to Grafton, and Route 9 between Bennington and Brattleboro. The Vermont Hospitality Council advises making advance reservations because the most popular lodgings may fill early on busy weekends during the foliage season. Some innkeepers may require a minimum two-night stay, especially on busy weekends.   Vermont tourism officials encourage visitors to take advantage of midweek specials during the foliage season as part of the statewide ‘Midweek Peek’ promotion. Deals range from discounted lodging to free Vermont products. For details, visit www.VermontVacation.com(link is external) Also available on the website are several tools for planning a Vermont Fall Foliage tour: Fall Foliage ForecasterLodging Availability ForecasterScenic DrivesFall Travel Tips last_img read more