SF Mission YIMBY movement wants to speed up affordable housing

first_imgSteven Buss is a self-described “gentrifier,” and he’s on a mission to soothe his conscience. “Look, I am a gentrifier. I’m not going to pretend to be something I’m not. I’m white, I’m relatively wealthy, I work in tech,” he said. “I know my presence in the neighborhood exacerbates gentrification, which is also why I want to help mitigate it.” Buss is the founder of Mission YIMBY, a nascent offshoot of the fast-growing YIMBY (Yes In My Backyard) movement that argues that San Francisco’s displacement problem is fueled by a lack of housing — market-rate housing, affordable housing, all of it. So, just build more housing, they say. Buss and Mission YIMBY, on the other hand, call for something slightly different: more affordable housing in the Mission, and much more market-rate housing everywhere else. He sees opportunity for market-rate housing in neighborhoods like Noe Valley that, Buss asserts, have historically limited higher-density developments by zoning its land for single-family homes. “The Mission is already doing its part — it’s doing more than its part — but what I really care about is forcing the other neighborhoods to build more,” he said, sipping a beer at El Rio last week, where he and some 15 other like-minded YIMBYs, most from the tech industry, were holding a Friendsgiving. Buss moved to San Francisco to work for Google in February 2016. He initially moved into a friend’s house in Bernal Heights because he couldn’t find an affordable place in the city. He was naturally drawn to the YIMBY movement and its promises that more housing supply, via market forces, will bring more affordability to the Bay Area. Yet, somewhere along the line, Buss had an epiphany. “I realized there are actually people the market will never serve,” he said. “It’s totally true that the Mission has faced a lot of displacement and gentrification, and those are objectively bad things,” he added. “And so I wanted to start Mission YIMBY to make sure that existing voices in the Mission are represented in YIMBY.” So far, Buss’s efforts to work with Mission activists have been touch-and-go. He’s attended several meetings of the activist group United To Save the Mission, but quickly became frustrated. “There was a lot of anger about changes in the neighborhood, and I wanted to be a voice of YIMBY saying we agree with you — we want more affordable housing,” he said. “But the things they settled on were protesting a wine bar, protesting the red lanes on Mission Street.” “None of that actually helps stop displacement,” he said. Going around the table at the YIMBY Thanksgiving, a common theme emerged: many there had recently moved into the neighborhood to work in tech, but felt guilty for their part in changing the neighborhood. “They think there’s no place to build or they blame themselves that they, as tech employees, have ruined the city,” Amrit Pal, who works at the electronic payment startup Square, said at the party. “There’s a lot of guilt in the tech community about this.”Tom Hirschfeld, who works at a large startup, moved to the city in 2014 and joined YIMBY after housing policy discussions in comments sections and on Twitter weren’t enough. He was also troubled by his newcomer lifestyle compared to that of long-time residents. “If me as an engineer at a tech company is struggling to pay rent and secure a financial future here, then people who are less well off than me are, by definition, struggling harder than I am — and that is an issue,” he said. Hirschfeld believes there are two communities the Mission: people like him who are “wealthier and whiter,” work in tech, and have moved to the neighborhood in the last ten years; and longer-time residents. The groups, Hirschfeld has noticed, only interact at places like taquerias and laundromats. “So what I would like to do as an organizer is bridge the gaps between the underserved communities in the Mission, who have serious concerns with gentrification and their changing role in the community,” he said. But, like Buss, Hirschfeld’s efforts to bring long-term residents into the YIMBY fold have so far come up short. He’s volunteered at Mission Graduates, which for him was personally “eye-opening,” but failed to bring in any new members. He’s also attended community meetings focused on the 2000-2070 Bryant Street project’s affordable component, but he left frustrated by the “five- or six-year” completion timeline.  YIMBY Action, in fact, recently sponsored a ballot measure that would streamline affordable housing projects if they have the proper zoning — a measure many of the YIMBYs I spoke to were poised to canvas for. Scott Feeney, a tech worker who moved to San Francisco in 2014, was so “depressed” by the housing situation he considered washing his hands of San Francisco entirely. But he found the YIMBY movement and felt empowered.  Asked about the notion of guilt among Mission YIMBYs, Feeney said, “I don’t think anyone should feel guilty for to moving to place with good jobs. … [But] I think there’s a recognition that we need to be sensitive because there’s a difference in privilege — and not come in and say, ‘I want to make Mission in my own vision.’” 0%center_img Tags: Affordable Housing • gentrification • housing Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

SF City Attorney sues couple for turning home into illegal hotel

first_imgSan Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera is using a gunfight that surprised a sleepy street in Bernal Heights last October as part of his salvo against property owners who illegally rent out their homes on short-term rental sites such as Airbnb.On Wednesday, Herrera announced that his office had filed a lawsuit against the couple that own 212 Banks St., which on October 14 became the site of a party-turned-gun battle. There were no fatalities and only one injury that night, but the hail of bullets sprayed parked cars with bullets and sent partiers fleeing.According to the lawsuit, Erik Rogers and Anshu Singh rented their home out to tourists for most nights between June 2016 and October 2017, sometimes for as much as $800 a night. Meanwhile, they lived in Bali, Indonesia.“In the middle of a housing crisis, you have a couple who aren’t even living in the country turning a house into an illegal hotel for tourists and partiers. This could have been a home that kept one more family in San Francisco. Instead, it brought a deluge of gunfire to a quiet neighborhood. We are changing that,” Herrera said in a press release. San Francisco prohibits owners from leasing their property for less than 30 days. Owners are allowed to apply for a permit to rent their homes for brief periods of time, but they must reside in the property for 275 nights of the year.In November 2016, Rogers applied with the Office of Short Term Rentals for a permit but was denied on the basis that it was not his primary residence, according to the lawsuit.That did not stop Rogers. This is the second lawsuit this month in which Herrera targets San Francisco those flouting the city’s restrictions on short-term rentals. Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newsletterEmail Address 0% Tags: Airbnb • dennis herrera • housing Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

Fire clears 14unit building at 19th and Mission

first_img Email Address By around 3:30 p.m. the fire was extinguished, even before firefighters arrived. No damage was reported. A fire broke out Mission Street near 19th around 3:10 p.m. Friday, evacuating tenants of the 14-unit building.No injuries were reported and firefighters on scene said that the small blaze was caused by welders doing their work too close to wood.Witnesses said that just after 3 p.m. they saw thick smoke billowing from the building.“I was going in and saw the smoke coming in,” said Elizabeth, a tenant of the building. She said she heard no alarm and had to notify her neighbors.center_img Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newsletterlast_img

Luke Thompson Tommy Makinson and Mark Percival me

first_imgLuke Thompson, Tommy Makinson and Mark Percival met up with the rest of the squad in Manchester on Friday.And judging on the pictures below the Saints boys look sharp!England play four Tests this autumn; France at Leigh Sports Village on October 17, before a three-Test series against New Zealand at the KCOM Stadium in Hull (October 27), Anfield in Liverpool (November 4) and Elland Road in Leeds (November 11).last_img

Columbus Co student arrested for weapons threats at school

first_imgLAKE WACCAMAW, NC (WWAY) — An East Columbus High School student was arrested Thursday after authorities said she brought two weapons to school after threatening other students.The Columbus County Sheriff’s Office said at about 1 p.m. school authorities were notified that a female student, 14, was possibly in possession of a homemade incendiary device and a weapon.- Advertisement – A school resource officer found the homemade incendiary device on the East Columbus campus on Gator Lane in Lake Waccamaw.The student was located with a large steak knife in her possession. Authorities seized both items.The sheriff’s office said during the investigation, they discovered that the teenager threatened to harm two East Columbus students. They said she had both weapons in her possession with the intent of carrying out the threats while she was at school Thursday.Related Article: Southport to update public on police department probe next weekThe teenage student was arrested and charged with possession of a weapon of mass destruction on educational property and more charges are expected, according to the sheriff’s office.last_img read more

New Hanover County man reported missing

first_img Watts is described as a white male with a slender build. He is 6’ 01” tall and weighs 170-180 pounds. He has brown eyes, short brown/grey hair and has a beard.The sheriff’s office says Watts has a scar on the back of his head and a tattoo of dog tags on his right side.If you know where he may be, call the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office at (910) 798-4191. Steve Watts (Photo source: New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — The New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office is looking for a man who has been missing for more than two weeks.Stephen Ryan Watts, 44, was last seen on Wednesday, Sept. 26, at 5110 S. College Road. He was wearing a grey shirt, dark shorts and tennis shoes.- Advertisement – last_img

Royal Wedding cake baker to be a part of Azalea Festivals Chefs

first_imgWILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — A baker who created a royal wedding cake is coming from across the pond to be a part of this year’s Azalea Festival events.The North Carolina Azalea Festival will be hosting a public meet and greet with Claire Ptak, owner of Violet Bakery from London. Claire is the baker made famous for baking the royal wedding cake of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle in May 2018.- Advertisement – Ptak created a bespoke cake installation for the couple using vanilla sponge, Amalfi lemon curd and elderflower Swiss meringue buttercream using Sandringham Estate’s elderflower cordial for the royal wedding.Price Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding cake in 2018. (Photo: Kensington Palace)The meet and greet will take place on Friday, January 18 from 3-5 pm at One Belle Bakery, 1616 Shipyard Blvd in Wilmington.The meet and greet is free and open to the public. Guests will be able to meet Claire and take photos and get autographs. Guests will also be able to purchase inspired treats made by One Belle Bakery, with opportunities to meet the owner and lead baker at One Belle, Anna Echols.Related Article: Local fans meet royal wedding cake bakerPtak will be featured in North Carolina Azalea Festival’s 2nd annual Chefs’ Showcase, happening Saturday, January 19 at the Hotel Ballast from 1 – 4:30 pm.The Chefs’ Showcase was a new event to the Festival in 2018.The afternoon culinary adventure is a seated, 5-course meal with wine pairings, light entertainment, and high-end silent auction items. Notable chefs from our region (and beyond) work together to prepare the dishes.2019 Chefs’ Showcase Chefs:Baker Claire Ptak – Violet Bakery from LondonChef Steve Foote – LM Restaurants Corporate ChefChef William “Kelly” Robey – Hotel BallastChef James Patterson – Sedgefield Country ClubChef Matthew Register – Southern Smoke BBQWith Special guest Anna Echols of One Belle BakeryTickets to the Chefs’ Showcase are still available for sale for $75 at the Azalea Festival Ticket Office or online. This event sold out last year.Get tickets herelast_img read more

Pope to host South Sudans divided leaders in peace retreat next week

first_imgPope Francis waves to crowds in St. Peter’s square during the weekly general audience at the Vatican, April 3, 2019. REUTERS/Yara NardiPope Francis waves to crowds in St. Peter’s square during the weekly general audience at the Vatican, April 3, 2019. REUTERS/Yara Nardi Pope Francis will host the divided leaders of South Sudan at the Vatican next week to help them solidify a faltering peace agreement ending the civil war in the world’s youngest country.The meeting, which a Vatican statement on Wednesday called a “spiritual retreat”, could increase the chances of a visit by the pope to the South Sudanese capital, Juba.The leaders will include President Salva Kiir, First Vice President and former rebel leader Riek Machar and the other four vice presidents and Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Vatican’s Secretary of State, told reporters.“We know the pope wants to go there and we know that the situation has improved a little, especially after the agreement was signed, and also because of the good will of the people who are involved the situation,” Parolin said.Oil-producing South Sudan, which became independent in 2011, descended into civil war in December 2013 when a dispute between Kiir and Machar — who was vice president then — sparked fighting, often along ethnic lines.In September the two sides signed a power-sharing deal calling on the main rival factions to assemble, screen and train their respective forces and unify them into a national army before the formation of a unity government next month.That has not happened. The government, which has faced frequent international criticism over corruption and rights abuses, blames a lack of funding from donors.“It will be a moment of spirituality and above all, it will help make them aware of the responsibility that politicians and authorities have,” Parolin said on the sidelines of a conference on religious freedom at the U.S. embassy to the Vatican.All six of the leaders are Christian, as is more than half the population of South Sudan. Sudan is predominantly Muslim.About 400,000 people have been killed and more than a third of the country’s 12 million people uprooted by the civil war – a conflict punctuated by multiple rounds of mediation followed by renewed bloodshed.The conflict sparked Africa’s worst refugee crisis since the 1994 Rwandan genocide and plunged parts of the country into famine. More than 875,000 refugees have fled into neighbouring Uganda since the war broke out.Parolin said the pope, who met Kiir at the Vatican on March 16, would attend at least part of the retreat. Last month, the Vatican said the pope had asked aides to resume planning for a visit that was scrapped in 2017 because of security concerns.A Church source said the retreat would be held on April 10-11.WhatsApp SharePrint <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>last_img read more

Well be celebrating victory soon – Sudanese community leader

first_img Sudanese demonstrators attend Friday prayers as they protest against the army’s announcement that President Omar al-Bashir would be replaced by a military-led transitional council, near Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer 1 of 21 Sudanese demonstrators gather to protest against the army’s announcement that President Omar al-Bashir would be replaced by a military-led transitional council, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS A Sudanese demonstrator celebrates after Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer Sudanese demonstrator walks between the military during celebrations after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer A Sudanese military officer and demonstrators celebrate after Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer Sudanese demonstrators celebrate after Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer ResignationsDespite the optimism of change for Sudan, there have been some early resignations from the transitional military council.The first to put forward his resignation was the current military chief Awad Mohamed Ahmed Ibn Auf, who led Bashir’s ousting. Only 48 hours had past since the military coup took control, according to African media outlets. Awad was originally named defence minister in Bashir’s cabinet following a reshuffle in February. He was expected to lead the transitional council to civilian elections.Lieutenant General Abdel-Fatah al-Burhan Abdel-Rahman, Bashir’s Chief of Staff on ground forces was named as his replacement.A further resignation has come from Salih Ghosh, Sudan’s head of National Intelligence and Security Service. Ghosh is understood to have been instrumental in deploying NISS agents in the crackdown on protestors across the last four months. Countless demonstrators, activitists and journalists have been killed, wounded in detained in that time. Ghosh is also understood to have played a part in the 1989 coup that led to Bashir’s accension to power.The new council leader has accepted his resignation.WhatsApp Sudanese demonstrators protest against the army’s announcement that President Omar al-Bashir would be replaced by a military-led transitional council, near Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer Sudanese demonstrators celebrate after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer Sudanese demonstrators sleep after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer A Sudanese demonstrator wears a national flag as he arrives to protest against the army’s announcement that President Omar al-Bashir would be replaced by a military-led transitional council, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer Sudanese military join demonstrators to celebrate after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer Sudanese demonstrators celebrate after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS/Stringercenter_img Sudanese demonstrators pose for a photograph to celebrate after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> A Sudanese demonstrator waves a national flag as he arrives to protest against the army’s announcement that President Omar al-Bashir would be replaced by a military-led transitional council, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS Sudanese military officer joins demonstrators as they celebrate after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer A Sudanese demonstrator uses a traditional drum to celebrate after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer Sudanese demonstrators celebrate after the Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer FILE PHOTO: People are seen in the streets after televised statement by Defence Minister Awad Mohamed Ahmed Ibn Auf in Khartoum, Sudan April 11. 2019 in this still image taken from a video obtained from social media. Noon Gailoub/via REUTERS A Sudanese demonstrator waves a national flag as he arrives to protest against the army’s announcement that President Omar al-Bashir would be replaced by a military-led transitional council, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERSA Sudanese demonstrator waves a national flag as he arrives to protest against the army’s announcement that President Omar al-Bashir would be replaced by a military-led transitional council, outside the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 12, 2019. REUTERS In the wake of recent political upheaval in Sudan, Malta’s Sudanese community is cautiously optimistic about the future.Speaking to Newsbook.com.mt, the leader of the Sudanese community in Malta Mohamed Ibrahim, said that ‘soon they will be celebrating their victory.’His optimism comes as the country’s long standing leader President Omar Al-Bashir was toppled after almost 30 years controlling Sudan and later North Sudan.  The move follows months of protests in the capital Khartoum in which students and locals have taken to the streets objecting to the government’s planned price increases in food and fuel.This came to a head on Thursday when a military coup led by the Sudan’s Defence Minister Mohammed Ahmed Awad Ibn Auf, overthrew and detained Bashir on Thursday and replaced him the following day with a transitional military council.In addition to calling for a transitional period for democratic elections, the council also announced that instead of sending Bashir to the International Criminal Court in the Hague, it would try Bashir in Sudan.Quoting a police spokesperson Reuters reports that around 16 people had been killed and a further 20 were injured by gunfire at protests on both Thursday and Friday. Government buildings and private citizens property were also damaged in the protests.300,000 or 10,000?In the past three decades, Bashir had been accused of committing an array of human rights abuses against the country’s people.The International Criminal Court issued a warrant for his arrest back in 2009 and 2010 when it charged Al-Bashir with committing crimes against humanity and genocide. The UN had estimated that the Darfur conflict 300,000 people were killed and nearly 3 million have been displaced because of it.  This is compared to the fraction the Sudanese government put forward (10,000).The ICC prosecutor said that Mr Al-Bashir, ‘masterminded and implemented a plan to destroy in substantial part’ the killing of three ethnic tribes in the region.‘Our dignity has been brushed [aside by] this government. We have been killed and separated from our families, forced to flee around the world. Sudan is a rich country but we had become the poorest people forced to become beggars standing in rows in refugee camps waiting for assistance from locals and international organisations,’ Ibrahim says.Scenes from Al Fashir, Sudan Credit: Saddam Salih‘He needs to go’Mr Ibrahim explained to Newsbook.com.mt in December last year, that the protests against Bashir were a regular occurrence.They were aimed at ousting him and readdressing the inequality and lack of access to food, water and transportation. Although he and others left Sudan, nothing has changed, things have only gotten worse.Malta’s Sudanese community calling for their nation’s leader to go‘Those who are supporting the government, they don’t have any problems and they don’t feel the same equality others are facing in their lives. It’s been happening time and again. We have no solution so we should throw him out,’ he told Newsbook.com.mt in December last year.’To raise awareness of the situation happening in Khartoum, the Sudanese Community organised a demonstration in Valletta as part of the growing solidarity in world capitals.‘That’s the least we can do here.’ Sudanese military officers and a demonstrator pose for a photograph in celebration after Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer A Sudanese military officer and a demonstrator celebrate after Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer SharePrint A Sudanese military officer and demonstrators gesture in celebration after Defence Minister Awad Ibn Auf stepped down as head of the country’s transitional ruling military council, as protesters demanded quicker political change, near the Defence Ministry in Khartoum, Sudan April 13, 2019. REUTERS/Stringerlast_img read more

Blow to Turkeys Erdogan as opposition wins big in Istanbul

first_imgSupporters attend a rally of Ekrem Imamoglu, mayoral candidate of the main opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP), in Beylikduzu district, in Istanbul, Turkey, June 23, 2019. REUTERS/Kemal AslanSupporters attend a rally of Ekrem Imamoglu, mayoral candidate of the main opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP), in Beylikduzu district, in Istanbul, Turkey, June 23, 2019. REUTERS/Kemal Aslan Turkey’s main opposition claimed a decisive victory on Sunday in Istanbul’s re-run election, dealing one of the biggest blows to President Tayyip Erdogan during his 16 years in power and promising a new beginning in the country’s largest city.Ekrem Imamoglu, mayoral candidate of the secularist Republican People’s Party (CHP), was leading with 54% of votes versus 45% for Erdogan’s AK Party (AKP) candidate, with more than 99% of ballots opened, Turkish broadcasters said.The election was Istanbul’s second in three months after results of an initial March vote were scrapped, setting up the do-over as a test of Turks’ ability to check what many saw as their president’s increasingly authoritarian power.“Today, 16 million Istanbul residents have renewed our faith in democracy and refreshed our trust in justice,” Imamoglu told supporters.His AKP opponent, former Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, congratulated him and wished him “all the luck” in serving Istanbul, Turkey’s commercial hub. Erdogan also tweeted his congratulations to the CHP candidate.Imamoglu had won the original mayoral election on March 31 by a narrow margin, which prompted the Islamist-rooted AKP to demand a re-run, citing what it said were voting irregularities.The High Election Board’s decision to grant that request drew sharp criticism from Turkey’s Western allies and from Erdogan’s opponents at home, stirring concerns about the rule of law and raising the stakes for the re-run.Broadcasters put the CHP’s lead on Sunday at about 800,000 votes, eclipsing the roughly 13,000-vote margin in March.The election board said it would announce the election results as soon as possible.“While March 31 was a mayoral election, this re-run was one to put an end to the dictatorship,” said Gulcan Demirkaya, 48, from the city’s AKP-leaning Kagithane district.“God willing, I would like to see (Imamoglu) as the president in five years’ time,” she said. “The one-man rule should come to an end. For the first time in a long time, I am very happy and proud for my country.”JUSTICE AND LOVEImamoglu, a former businessman and district mayor who waged an inclusive campaign and avoided criticising Erdogan, said he was ready to work with the AKP to tackle Istanbul’s problems, including its transport gridlock and the needs of its Syrian refugees.“In this new page in Istanbul, there will from now on be justice, equality, love, tolerance; while misspending (of public funds), pomp, arrogance and the alienation of the other will end,” he said.The handover of power in the mayor’s office could shed further light on what Imamoglu said was the misspending of billions of lira at the Istanbul municipality, which has a budget of around $4 billion.Erdogan himself served as Istanbul’s mayor in the 1990s before he embarked on a national political career, dominating Turkish politics first as prime minister, then as president. He presided over years of strong economic growth. But critics say he has become increasingly autocratic and intolerant of dissent.The second defeat in Istanbul marked a major embarrassment for the president and could also weaken what until recently seemed to be his iron grip on power. He had campaigned hard and targeted Imamoglu directly with accusations of lying and cheating.“This is definitely going to have an impact on the future of Turkish politics given the margin of victory. It’s an alarming sign for the AKP establishment,” said Sinan Ulgen, visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe in Brussels and a former Turkish diplomat.Analysts say the loss could set off a Cabinet reshuffle in Ankara and adjustments to foreign policy. It could even trigger a national election earlier than 2023 as scheduled, although the leader of the AKP’s nationalist ally played down that prospect.“Turkey should now return to its real agenda, the election process should close,” MHP party leader Devlet Bahceli said. “Talking of an early election would be among the worst things that can be done to our country.”Turkey’s economy is in recession and the United States, its NATO ally, has threatened sanctions if Erdogan goes ahead with plans to install Russian missile defences.The uncertainty over the fate of Istanbul and potential delays in broader economic reforms have kept financial markets on edge.Turkey’s lira currency tumbled after the decision to annul the March vote and is down nearly 10% this year in part on election jitters. It edged higher on Sunday night.WhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> SharePrintlast_img read more