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Month: July 2019

Am I Elderly

first_imgby, Martin Bayne, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesToday marks the 11th day of rehab in a Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF), following an acute hospital stay for pneumonia. I was watching television this morning and during a commercial break for a drug that is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, the pharmaceutical company made it clear that the drug was not appropriate for youngsters and the elderly . . . and I start thinking, Am I the “elderly?”Cut to a memory of me in high school, reading George Orwell’s 1984, saying to myself, It’s’ only 1968 — it’s hard to believe I’ll be around in 1984.But, as fate would have it, I did survive. And then some.And when Lennon, McCartney, et al. asked, ‘Will you still need me; will you still feed me, when I’m 64,” never, in my wildest dreams did I believe I’d make it to this, my 64th year.But I still don’t know what “elderly” means.One thing, however, has become crystal clear during these last 64 years — the American long-term care system is on the cusp of a great transition.Collapsing in on itself, is a 100-year old top-down management system that warehouses our parents until they die — filling their days with “activities” to help keep them busy and entertained.Baby Boomers will demand more. As we should.We will create Intentional Communities, designed from the ground up with the latest in assistive technologies; operated for the well-being of its residents, not the profitability of shareholders.In the interim, I will continue my daily Occupational and Physical Therapy, and with any luck, I’ll be assessed by someone from my assisted living facility in the next couple of days. Standing, walking, pivoting: prerequisites for returning to my home and extended family.Just enough time to ask a couple of 95-year old residents of this SNF what “elderly” means?Related PostsTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: elderly skilled nursing homelast_img read more

WHO declares escalating Ebola outbreak an international emergency

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The WHO declaration is “an alarm call that will hopefully stimulate the richer countries to provide more money and personnel,” says Preben Aavitsland, a Norwegian epidemiologist who helped draft the IHR. But Aavitsland says that alarm should have gone out earlier. “In my view it should have happened months ago, when the infection spread to other countries than Guinea,” he says.With 1779 cases and 961 deaths officially recorded as of Wednesday, the outbreak in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria is by far the worst for Ebola in history. There were only 425 cases in the most serious outbreak thus far, in 2000 to 2001 in Uganda*, and many other outbreaks were contained after just a few dozen cases.What’s more, WHO’s official tally is probably far too low, one expert told a congressional hearing yesterday in Washington, D.C. “Our epidemiologists and medical personnel believe that these numbers represent 25 to 50% of what is happening,” Ken Isaacs, a vice president at Samaritan’s Purse—the group that repatriated two staffers suffering from Ebola and helped provide an experimental treatment for them—told a hearing of the U.S. House of Representatives’ Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations. Chan today acknowledged that infected people often don’t seek care and that the real number of victims is probably higher.At yesterday’s hearing, Isaac labeled the international response to the outbreak as a “failure.” Doctors Without Borders and Samaritan’s Purse, where he oversees international programs and government relations, have provided the bulk of outside medical support so far, he stressed. “The international community was comfortable in allowing two relief agencies to provide all of the clinical care for the Ebola victims in three countries,” he charged. “It was not until July the 26th, when [U.S. patients] Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol were confirmed positive, that the world sat up and paid attention.”His organization’s epidemiologists predict that the disease soon will come out “with a fury” in Nigeria. “We’re going to see death tolls in numbers that we can’t imagine now,” he warned. “The truth is the cat is most likely already out of the bag.”Asked why WHO convened the emergency committee only this week, WHO Assistant Director-General Keiji Fukuda this morning said the organization was initially focused on coordinating the response on the ground and on raising awareness and drumming up political support, for instance at a meeting of health ministers in Accra in early July and a meeting with Chan and West African presidents last week. It was the spread of the virus to Nigeria that triggered WHO to call the committee’s meeting, Fukuda said.The declaration of a PHEIC came after the panel held a 4.5 hour teleconference on Wednesday and another 6-hour conference on Thursday, Fukuda said. The committee issued a range of specific recommendations for stopping the spread of the virus. Among other things, Ebola-affected countries should check every person leaving the country for possible signs of Ebola infection. “The exit screening should consist of, at a minimum, a questionnaire, a temperature measurement and, if there is a fever, an assessment of the risk that the fever is caused” by the Ebola virus, it said.Anybody who has an illness consistent with Ebola should not be allowed to travel, the panel said, unless as part of an appropriate medical evacuation. Neither should people who have been in contact with patients; they should be monitored for Ebola symptoms and fever for 21 days.Wider restrictions on travel—such as halting airline traffic—would be counterproductive, Fukuda said, because they would not help control the disease and would increase anxiety. “Most people who go to business meetings or family gatherings [in the affected countries] are at low risk of Ebola infection. So we don’t think a ban on that kind of travel makes any sense at all,” he said. “But it will have a lot of bad effects on the community.”With reporting by Jon Cohen and Kai Kupferschmidt. *Correction, 8 August, 8:55 a.m.: This story originally said the Ebola outbreak of 2000 to 2001 was in Sudan instead of Uganda.*Update, 8 August, 12:24 p.m.: This article has been updated to include the most recent case numbers, as of 6 August, which were released today.*The Ebola Files: Given the current Ebola outbreak, unprecedented in terms of number of people killed and rapid geographic spread, Science and Science Translational Medicine have made a collection of research and news articles on the viral disease freely available to researchers and the general public. Emailcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) With cases rapidly mounting in four West African countries, the World Health Organization (WHO) today declared the Ebola outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), a designation that allows the agency to issue recommendations for travel restrictions but also sends a strong message that more resources need to be mobilized to bring the viral disease under control.”The outbreak is moving faster than we can control it,” said WHO Director-General Margaret Chan at a press conference in Geneva, Switzerland, this morning. Chan said the declaration of a PHEIC serves as “an urgent call for international solidarity.” The affected countries don’t have the resources to battle the disease alone, and neither does her agency. With three major humanitarian crises on its hands—in Syria, South Sudan, and the Central African Republic—as well as three important disease outbreaks—Ebola, the H7N9 influenza virus, and MERS—WHO is “extremely stretched,” she said. So are organizations such as Doctors Without Borders, which do much of the control work on the ground.This is only the third time the health agency has issued a PHEIC declaration since the new International Health Regulations (IHR), a global agreement on the control of diseases, were adopted in 2005. The previous two instances were in 2009, for the H1N1 influenza pandemic, and in May for the resurgence of polio.last_img read more

Multiple boosts for cancer immunotherapy

first_imgResearchers shy away from the c-word—cure—but they say that these immune checkpoint inhibitors could ultimately transform cancer into a manageable disease more like diabetes or HIV infection. “The immune system may be able to keep the tumor in check, even if it doesn’t eliminate every last cell,” says cancer immunologist Drew Pardoll of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland. Prospects like that led Science to anoint cancer immunotherapy as its Breakthrough of the Year for 2013.Yet so far, published studies have confirmed that the checkpoint inhibitors work only in kidney cancer, melanoma, and lung cancer. And even in those cancers, usually less than half of patients benefit.In one of the new studies, a team led by oncologist Thomas Powles of Queen Mary University of London tested a new antibody created by Genentech of South San Francisco, California, in a different cancer: a difficult-to-treat form of bladder cancer. Instead of blocking PD-1 on immune cells, the antibody disables PD-L1, a protein that cancer cells and some other cells display to stimulate PD-1 and inhibit T cells. The Genentech-funded study found that the antibody shrank bladder tumors in 26% of the patients. Therapy for this type of cancer has not advanced in 25 years, notes Hopkins medical oncologist Julie Brahmer, who wasn’t connected to the research. “This is truly groundbreaking,” she says.In a second study, also funded by Genentech, translational oncologist Roy Herbst of the Yale School of Medicine and colleagues tested the antibody against several other kinds of incurable cancers. The patients in this trial “had exhausted one, two, three lines of treatment,” Herbst says, but he and his colleagues found that the antibody caused tumors to shrink in lung cancer, head and neck cancer, melanoma, and other tumor types. “It is unexpected and exciting to see a single drug having an impact on so many kinds of cancer,” says Suzanne Topalian, a cancer immunologist at Hopkins who didn’t take part in any of the studies.Still, fewer than 20% of the patients in the Yale trial saw their tumors dwindle. “It’s a big conundrum to predict who will benefit from these treatments,” Herbst says. When he and his colleagues analyzed tumors from the trial’s patients, they found a potential explanation: variation in the amount of PD-L1 manufactured not by the cancer cells, but rather by the immune cells that had invaded the tumor. (The cancer cells may somehow compel immune cells to make the self-inhibiting molecules.) If these invading cells produced plenty of the protein, patients were more likely to respond to the antibody therapy. Testing PD-L1 levels in patients’ tumors might enable doctors to identify the people with the best chance of benefiting from the new antibody, Herbst says.In a third Nature study, tumor immunologist and physician Antoni Ribas of the University of California, Los Angeles, and colleagues pinpointed another biomarker that might help improve the success rate of the immune-awakening antibodies. After poring over biopsy samples from the melanoma tumors of 46 clinical trial participants treated with a PD-1–blocking antibody, the researchers found that the best portent of treatment success was the abundance of cytotoxic T cells at the edge of the tumors. The more cells crowding into the edge of the tumor, the better.To confirm their finding and gauge its usefulness, Ribas and colleagues then analyzed biopsy samples from melanoma patients in a clinical trial at another hospital. Using just this one feature, they correctly predicted how well 13 of the 15 patients would respond to the antibody therapy. “An assay that detects the presence of [cytotoxic T] cells in tumors could be the first decision point in the treatment of patients,” Ribas says.Researchers are already looking at how to use the results of these studies to improve cancer immunotherapy, possibly by combining it with other types of treatments. “The next use will be in combination with other cancer drugs to get a greater impact,” Topalian says. Tumors persist and grow in part because they squelch the immune system, but researchers have recently turned the tables with treatments that prompt immune cells to hunt down malignant cells. The strategy is effective only in some patients, however, and so far has been shown to work in just a few cancer types. But studies online today in Nature reveal how one kind of immunotherapy, so-called immune checkpoint inhibitors, can be targeted to new cancers—and how doctors can single out the patients who are most likely to benefit from these drugs.“As a unit, these papers fill out many of the gaps in our understanding” about these cancer immunotherapies, says Jedd Wolchok, a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City who wasn’t connected to the studies.Tumors can suppress the cytotoxic T cells that would normally attack them by activating two immune cell surface receptors , CTLA4 and PD-1. But blocking CTLA4 and PD-1 with antibodies can unleash the T cells. Several clinical trials of patients with incurable cancers have shown dramatic effects from these antibodies. “What we are seeing is long-term disease control,” Wolchok says. “In some cases, people are living long enough to die from another cause.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Hubble repairman to retire from NASAs top science spot

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) NASA Associate Administrator John Grunsfeld, an astrophysicist and astronaut who worked on three repair missions to the Hubble Space Telescope, will retire from his position as head of the science mission directorate on 30 April, the agency announced today.Grunsfeld served for many years as an astronaut within NASA’s human spaceflight division, and flew on five shuttle missions. Since 2012, he led NASA’s science division, where he became an advocate for marrying the agency’s human and robotic exploration divisions.It was not his first time at headquarters. In 2004, he was chief scientist—an advisory role to the administrator—and he was put in the difficult position of having to defend a decision to cancel Hubble’s final servicing mission (which ended up going ahead in 2009). After a stint at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Maryland, Grunsfeld was called back to headquarters in Washington, D.C., in 2012, following the departure of Associate Administrator Ed Weiler. Emailcenter_img Like Weiler, Grunsfeld oversaw a bevy of planetary missions. He arrived just in time to see the successful landing of the Curiosity rover in 2012 (a mission that Weiler delayed because of problems with the rover’s motors). This year, Grunsfeld made a similar decision to postpone but not cancel the InSight mission to Mars because of problems with an instrument designed to measure tremors. Grunsfeld also got to see the Pluto flyby, led by former science chief Alan Stern, although work for that mission began a quarter-century before.The most important thing Grunsfeld did while sitting atop the science division may have been to keep the $8.7 billion James Webb Space Telescope on budget and on track for launch in 2018. In an interview with Science in 2012, Grunsfeld said that keeping “Hubble 2.0” on track was his top priority. “Hubble 2.0” would be “amazing,” he said. “But we have to deliver it.”In the end, most will remember Grunsfeld for his joyful work as the starry-eyed repairman to the Hubble telescope, a mission that he loved so much that he was willing to risk his life for it. NASA said that following Grunsfeld’s retirement, deputy Geoff Yoder would serve as acting associate administrator until a permanent replacement is named. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Can escaped pets rescue endangered species

first_imgThe descendants of escaped exotic pets could save endangered species. That’s what a team of scientists argues in a new paper, which proposes replenishing decimated populations of animals with their kin from the pet trade. One potential target is the yellow-crested cockatoo, one of the world’s most prized household birds whose wild numbers are plummeting.”This is a novel proposal for dealing with an increasingly common situation,” says David Wilcove, an ecologist at Princeton University who was not involved with the work.The yellow-crested cockatoo (Cacatua sulphurea) is a native of Indonesia’s Sulawesi and Lesser Sunda islands. Its feathers are bright white, save for a shock of golden plumage at the crown, and the bird’s medium size makes it ideal for a cage. The bird is a popular pet, but intense poaching has reduced its population to fewer than 7000 in the wild, earning the animal “critically endangered” status on the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Ironically, there are too many yellow-crested cockatoos elsewhere. In Hong Kong, China, birds brought from Indonesia and sold as pets that escaped or were released have founded a growing, self-sustaining population of a couple hundred individuals in the city’s woodlands. They’re competing with native birds for nesting sites and food and are considered an invasive species.So what if you could, so to speak, kill two birds with one stone? Wild bird trapping is illegal in Hong Kong, but if the city made an exception for the yellow-crested cockatoo and shipped the birds back to Indonesia, it could solve two problems at once.That’s what ecologists Luke Gibson of the University of Hong Kong and Ding Li Yong of the Australian National University in Canberra propose in a paper appearing online today in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. The approach could work for other animals as well, including not only escaped pets, but species that were introduced outside their ranges for sport hunting or for domestication. Gibson and Yong identify 49 species—including birds, mammals, and reptiles—that could benefit from the same strategy. In some cases, captured feral animals could replenish the native populations; in others they could be funneled into the pet trade, hopefully replacing those captured illegally in their native habitat.The list of species up for consideration includes the Philippine deer, now rare in the Philippines but damaging native vegetation on Guam and the Mariana Islands; a wild cow called the banteng, hunted to endangered status in Southeast Asia while there is a flourishing introduced population in Australia; and Burmese pythons—threatened in Asia, where the skin is used in traditional medicine—but now established in the Florida Everglades, where it is devastating foxes and rabbits.”Introduced species are usually considered a problem,” Gibson says. “In these cases we consider them to be an opportunity to help buffer declining populations in their native ranges.”The idea is “worth exploring,” says Philip Seddon, a conservation biologist at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. But the approach is “not likely to be a game changer for the management of either invasive or declining species, and carries some risk.”Boosting species in their native ranges with animals from feral populations may be easier than introducing captive-bred animals, Wilcove says. “Captivity tends to diminish the ability of species to survive in the wild,” he says; the prospects for translocating animals from one wild situation to another are “likely to be rosier.” He adds that there will be numerous logistical hurdles to clear. Among other things, various permits will probably be required to trap, transport, and release endangered species.In addition, selling captured feral animals into the wildlife trade could well increase demand for exotic pets, leading to more poaching, Seddon says. Gibson agrees that this would work only in very special cases. One is the Javan myna, which is so commonly kept as a caged bird in Indonesia that the wild population is now considered “vulnerable.” Yet in Singapore, some 100,000 Javan mynas are displacing native birds from nesting and feeding sites, making them a pest. Capturing the birds in Singapore to supply the market in Indonesia could reduce pressure on the native population, Gibson says.He and Yong stress that animals would have to be carefully checked for parasites and diseases before moving them to avoid exposing the native population to novel health threats.One of the biggest challenges, the scientists say, is ensuring that the conditions that led to the decline of the native populations in the first place—typically habitat loss and lax protection—have been corrected. Otherwise, there’s no point in translocating endangered species; on the contrary, for some species the best hope for avoiding extinction may be the safe havens they happened to find elsewhere on the planet.last_img read more

This twofaced membrane can create electricity—from nothing but salty water

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email This ‘two-faced’ membrane can create electricity—from nothing but salty water Imagine being stuffed into a crowded train car and noticing a less crowded one just down the platform. You’d probably want to move over as soon as possible. Particles that follow this balancing act—known as osmosis—spontaneously move from an area of high concentration to one of low concentration. Now, scientists have used this tendency to create a power-producing membrane that can harvest electric current from nothing but salty water.When ionic salts, made of bundles positively and negatively charged particles, dissolve in water, the bundles break apart, leaving positively and negatively charged particles free to participate in osmosis. By placing charged, thin membranes in between salty water and freshwater, scientists can create an expressway for the flowing particles, generating electric current. But these membranes are often expensive to manufacture and they tend to get leaky over time. That lets particles pass back through in the wrong direction, cutting into how much electricity they can produce.Now, researchers have developed a new kind of gatekeeper—a “two-faced” membrane that has different properties on either side, from the size of the pores to the charge of the membrane itself. This encourages a steady flow of charged particles from one side to the other while preventing them from drifting back in the wrong direction. These so-called Janus membranes, named after the ancient Roman god of gates and passages, can also be manufactured to have different-size pores and hold different charges, allowing them to accept different kinds of particles.center_img By Frankie SchembriOct. 26, 2018 , 2:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The researchers tested their Janus membranes with salty sea water on one side and fresh river water on the other. They found the devices were able to convert 35.7% of the chemical energy stored in the salty water into useable electricity. That’s as efficient as most wind turbines and higher than most solar cells, they report today in Science Advances.Next, the researchers plan to build larger membranes and see whether they can withstand the conditions of real sea and river water. If the membrane performs as well in “the wild,” the new membranes could be used to power remote communities with no other sources of renewable energy in just a few years, the researchers say. That suggests that when it comes to harvesting power from moving particles, being a little two-faced is a good thing.last_img read more

Podcast Where private research funders stow their cash and studying gun deaths

first_imgBernard Spragg A new Science investigation reveals several major private research funders—including the Wellcome Trust and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation—are making secretive offshore investments at odds with their organizational missions. Host Meagan Cantwell talks with writer Charles Piller about his deep dive into why some private funders choose to invest in these accounts.In the United States, gun injuries kill more children annually than pediatric cancer, but funding for firearm research pales in comparison. On this week’s show, host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Writer Meredith Wadman and emergency physician Rebecca Cunningham about how a new grant will jump-start research on gun deaths in children.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: Bernard Spragg; Music: Jeffrey Cook]*Correction, 27 December, 5 p.m.: The interview on studying gun deaths in children in the United States incorrectly says that NIH spent $3.1 million on research into pediatric gun deaths. The correct figure is $4.4 million.last_img read more

How far out can we forecast the weather Scientists have a new

first_imgChaos from storms and other small-scale phenomena will likely limit weather forecasts to 2 weeks. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) How far out can we forecast the weather? Scientists have a new answer iStock.com/ tonisvisuals Email By Paul VoosenFeb. 14, 2019 , 9:30 AMcenter_img Last month, as much of the United States shivered in Arctic cold, weather models predicted a seemingly implausible surge of balmy, springlike warmth. A week later, that unlikely forecast came true—testimony to the remarkable march of such models. Since the 1980s, they’ve added a new day of predictive power with each new decade. Today, the best forecasts run out to 10 days with real skill, leading meteorologists to wonder just how much further they can push useful forecasts.A new study suggests a humbling answer: another 4 or 5 days. In the regions of the world where most people live, the midlatitudes, “2 weeks is about right. It’s as close to be the ultimate limit as we can demonstrate,” says Fuqing Zhang, a meteorologist at Pennsylvania State University in State College who led the work, accepted for publication in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences.Forecasters must contend with the atmosphere’s turbulent flows, which nest and build on each other as they create clouds, power storms, and push forward cold fronts. A tiny disruption in one layer of turbulence can quickly snowball, infecting the next with its error. A 1969 paper by Massachusetts Institute of Technology mathematician and meteorologist Edward Lorenz introduced this dynamic, later dubbed the “butterfly effect.” His research showed that two nearly identical atmospheric models can diverge widely after 2 weeks because of an initial disturbance as minute as a butterfly flapping its wings. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country “That was a revolutionary insight,” says Richard Rotunno, a meteorologist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, who was not involved in the new study. If real, this 2-week descent into chaos would set a fundamental limit to the atmosphere’s predictability.Lorenz’s idea has been validated in theory. But until recently, global weather prediction models lacked the high resolution needed to test it by recreating the storm-forming processes driving the atmosphere’s chaos. Zhang hoped that the next generation of supercomputer-powered weather models, including those run by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts and the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS), would provide a credible test. Along with colleagues, he convinced the weather agencies to let them chew up expensive computing cycles running identical versions of several real-life weather events.Typically, weather models are fed observations from satellites, balloons, and other outposts, generating what are known as initial conditions. These renderings are far from perfect, and it’s difficult to know whether a model’s growing unreliability as it runs is due to its mismatch with reality or atmospheric chaos. Improving how these observations are sucked into computer models has played a big part in improving forecasts, and it has helped the European model outdo its competitors.The European model, like most of its peers, accounts for the remaining uncertainties in its initial conditions by running multiple versions of an event side by side, each with a slightly tweaked start, to come up with a consensus forecast. In Zhang’s experiments, he reduced this variation tenfold, essentially pretending that the model had a near-perfect view of the weather. He and his colleagues then ran the European model 120 times, with each run simulating 20 days, to recreate two large-scale weather events: a December 2015 cold snap in Northern Europe and June 2016 downpours in China. They also ran the cold snap using the next version of the U.S. Global Forecast System, which—barring another government shutdown—should deploy to forecasters next month.On both models, the renditions steadily diverged until—at the 2-week mark—they appeared wholly unrelated. In effect, the models’ forecasting skill fell to zero at that point. “It’s a very credible result,” says Eugenia Kalnay, a meteorologist at the University of Maryland in College Park who previously led the NWS’s modeling arm. Some researchers doubted Lorenz’s model, given that it lacked some important atmospheric features, she says, but this shows the underlying idea is sound. “It’s nice because it’s simple.”Two weeks may not be the absolute limit, Rotunno says. A similar exercise that ran last year on NCAR’s next-generation model found that the models started diverging between 2 weeks and 3 weeks. However, that model is not as battle-tested as the European gold standard, and the study could afford few runs, limiting its sample size. “At a practical level, they’re not going to issue those 3-week forecasts,” Rotunno says.Still, Zhang adds, it’s heartening to know that there’s room to improve on the gains of the last few decades. He saw those benefits firsthand last month when his airline suggested he rebook a flight to London 5 days in advance due to a potential snowstorm. He heeded the forecasters’ advice and had an enjoyable extra day in London. His original flight? Canceled.*Correction, 19 February, 12:55 p.m.: An earlier version of this story misstated the timing of the simulated cold snap and implied the U.S. model ran both weather events, rather than only one.last_img read more

Lions wounded by porcupines may be more likely to attack people

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe “It’s a very interesting and important study,” says Laurence Frank, project director of the Kenya-based conservation group Living with Lions, who wasn’t involved with the work. “I was actually surprised by the high rate of porcupine killing and eating” by the big cats, he says.As far back as the 1600s, people have encountered lions injured by porcupines. In 1656 alone, Jan van Riebeeck, commander for the Dutch East India Company, observed two dead lions in Cape Town, South Africa, with porcupine injuries: One, shot after it ate a cow, had numerous quills in its skin; the other, found dead on a beach, had a porcupine quill sticking deep in its chest. Lions don’t often attack porcupines, but they can when prey is scarce or if they are young and inexperienced hunters.To get a better sense of how often these encounters occur, and what impact they have on humans and other animals, Celesia—along with team leader Julian Kerbis Peterhans, a researcher at the Field Museum, and Thomas Gnoske, an assistant collections manager at the museum—scanned the scientific literature for evidence of porcupine attacks on lions. They also analyzed anecdotes such as van Riebeeck’s, which he recorded in his personal journal. Altogether, the researchers identified approximately 50 lions injured by porcupines, at least five of which went on to attack or kill people or livestock. Young male lions were the most likely to be injured, possibly because they’re inexperienced hunters, the team speculates.Perrott’s trophy, which was part of the 50, was scanned with computerized tomography at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine on behalf of the researchers. The scans confirmed that, based on the quill’s proximity to the lion’s frontal sinuses and other key nasal structures, the animal likely had difficulty smelling and had other impairments that would have made it hard to hunt. The researchers also deduced that the lion was approximately 4 years old when it died.The researchers don’t know how many porcupine-injured lions actually go on to kill people or livestock, but they believe it “greatly increases the risk,” Kerbis Peterhans says. He and his colleagues suspect the wounded lions are more likely to go after people and livestock because the cats are too weak or ill to pursue their typical prey, wildebeest and zebra, which are bigger, faster, and harder to locate. Indeed, at the time of its death, the “Darajani maneater” was “emaciated … with protruding backbone, scapula, ribs, limbs and pelvic carriage,” the researchers report.One major limitation of the study is that it contains no direct observation of lions being impaled by quills, wrote Craig Packer in an email. Packer, who directs the University of Minnesota’s Lion Research Center in St. Paul, also questioned the finding that young male lions—which tend to be solitary—are more likely to be injured by porcupines. “I’ve seen females remove quills from their pride mates, so it may just be that males are more likely to be seen with quills still stuck in their bodies.”If porcupines really are causing lions to attack people more frequently, Kerbis Peterhans says it’s critical that injured animals be treated as soon as possible. That won’t just save the big cats, he says, it could help save people as well. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country In 1965, an emaciated male lion attacked and killed a villager in the Darajani region of Tsavo, Kenya. Locals led American hunter John Perrott to the animal, where he shot and killed it. While admiring his trophy shortly thereafter, Perrott noticed something unusual: a sharp quill jutting out of the lion’s left nostril.Now, more than 50 years later, researchers have revealed that the quill belonged to a porcupine—and may have been behind the lion’s taste for people. “Every time [the lion] opened his mouth to eat, the damn quill pushed in further,” says Gastone Celesia, a volunteer at the Field Museum and professor emeritus of neurology at Loyola University, both in Chicago, Illinois. Celesia and his colleagues speculate that—starving and with a compromised sense of smell—the lion turned from its standard prey to an easier-to-catch quarry: humans.This may not be an isolated incident. A number of lion attacks on humans may have been prompted by porcupines injuring the big cats, Celesia and colleagues write this month in the Journal of East African Natural History. By Rachel CrowellMay. 21, 2019 , 11:00 AM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Lions wounded by porcupines may be more likely to attack people Email J. Sneesby/B. Wilkins/Getty Images A young lion grapples with a Cape porcupine in South Africa’s Kalahari Gemsbok National Park.last_img read more

Kevin Hunter Blames Wendy Williams For Strife

first_img Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Before the divorce, the two were allegedly close and now that has changed.Well, things do change when your dirty laundry is the open and if the 18-year-old has access to the Internet he is surely seeing all the reports about his daddy. For example, last month, Aveon Falstar, a former artist of Hunter, alleged on the podcast “unWineWithTashaK” that he had a sexual relationship with him throughout last year. He also accused Hunter of abuse. Hunter’s attorney has denied all allegations.Back in January, TMZ reported that someone alleging to work for Williams’ production company called the police and demanded they pay a safety visit to her house. They believed Hunter was poisoning Wendy. The 54-year-old reportedly denied the accusation to the police.Lastly, Sharina Hudson, Hunter’s alleged mistress, reportedly gave birth to their child in March, which was supposedly the breaking point for Williams.People.com reported an altercation broke out between father and son on Tuesday evening in West Orange, New Jersey. They allegedly got physical after a spat about him needing to work hard on his own and accusations of him being “brainwashed” by his mother. It reportedly got physical when Kevin Sr. allegedly put his son in a headlock, and we’re told Kevin Jr. punched him in the nose to break the hold. Kevin Hunter Jr. was charged with simple assault and was processed and released the same evening and was not taken to jail.The incident allegedly happened at a store parking lot. TMZ reports, “We’re told things bubbled over Tuesday night when the conversation continued, and Sr. told Jr. he needed to work hard on his own and without Wendy’s handouts.” Allegedly, Kevin Sr. also claimed Wendy was “brainwashing” their son to be against him. Kevin Hunter Sr. declined to not press charges.SEE ALSO:All The Ways Cops Are Still Trying To Cover Up LaQuan McDonald’s ExecutionOutrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothes Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family More By NewsOne Staff Jesse Jackson Demands ‘Justice Now’ At EJ Bradford’s Moving Funeral Ceremonycenter_img After years of martial trouble rumors,Wendy Williams is divorcing her husband Kevin Hunter of over two decades. However, the friction between Hunter and his 18-year-old son has now hit the media and he is putting all the blame on Wendy for their damaged relationship.SEE ALSO: Some No Name, Pitchy R&B Singer Disrespected Keith Sweat And Gets Demolished On TwitterTMZ reports, “Sources with direct knowledge of the divorce say Wendy’s estranged husband has been vocal, accusing Wendy of poisoning his relationship with their son, getting in his ear and talking smack about him… We’re told Kevin Sr. has made several attempts in recent weeks to spend time with his son to repair the relationship, but he got the cold shoulder. He’s also sent his boy lengthy texts … only to get one-word replies.” Kevin Hunter , The Wendy Williams Show , Wendy Williams Emantic "EJ" Fitzgerald Braford Jr. A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’last_img read more

Is tourism endangering these giant lizards

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Reinhard Dirscherl/Alamy Stock Photo Officials worry that the Komodo dragon population is declining because of tourism. Is tourism endangering one of the world’s most iconic lizard species? It seemed that way after the unexpected announcement that Komodo National Park in Indonesia, home of the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) may be partly closed to visitors for a full year.But scientists are puzzled. They say the Komodo dragons in the park are doing just fine. Instead of keeping out tourists, Indonesia should do more to protect Komodo dragons outside the park, some argue.Komodo National Park consists of a group of islands with a total land area of 407 square kilometers. The two largest ones, Komodo and Rinca, are home to Komodo dragon populations and are open to visits by tourists; some 160,000 people came in 2018, most of them foreigners. Tourism has made the Komodo dragons “tame” and less inclined to hunt, according to Viktor Laiskodat, governor of the East Nusa Tenggara province, where the park is located. In addition, rampant poaching has reduced the number of Timor deer (Cervus timorensis), the dragon’s main prey; as a result, the dragons have become smaller in size, Laiskodat recently claimed. To “manage the Komodo dragon’s habitat,” Komodo Island should be closed to visitors for a year, Laiskodat said on 18 January. Is tourism endangering these giant lizards?center_img By Dyna Rochmyaningsih Jan. 29, 2019 , 5:05 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The move will have to be coordinated with the country’s Ministry of Environment and Forestry, however, which may disagree. The plan has drawn sharp criticism from the tourism industry.And there is no need for the partial shutdown, says Maria Panggur, a scientist in charge of ecosystem monitoring at the park. According to government data, the park was home to a healthy population of more than 2700 Komodo dragons in 2017, more than 1000 of them living on Komodo Island. A study by Deni Purwandana of the Komodo Survival Program (KSP) in Denpasar, Indonesia, and colleagues found that the populations on both Komodo and Rinca have remained relatively stable between 2002 and 2014. “I can say that everything is under control within the national park area,” Panggur says.Human activity does have some effects on the population. A 2018 study by Purwandana showed that animals exposed to tourism—which get fed—were bigger, healthier, less alert, and had higher chances of survival than dragons elsewhere. But tourists can only visit about 5 square kilometers of the park; 95% of the Komodo dragons are not in contact with them, so the impact is minimal, Panggur says.Laiskodat is right that illegal hunting of Timor deer appears to be common; In December 2018, for instance, police intercepted 100 dead deer shipped to a harbor in nearby West Nusa Tenggara. But it’s not clear how keeping tourists out would solve that problem, and “there has been no statistical proof for the decline of the [deer] population,” says Achmad Ariefiandy, lead scientist at KSP. (The latest official data recorded 3900 deer in the national park.) Authorities are trying to stop illegal hunting; there is also a deer breeding program in West Nusa Tenggara that aims to meet the local demand for deer meat without hunting.“If the governor really wants to protect Komodo dragons, he should start looking at Flores,” the province’s main island, Panggur says. Northern Flores is home to a Komodo dragon population of unknown size that is “more sensitive to extinction,” because of its proximity to humans and the lack of conservation resources, says Tim Jessop, an integrative ecologist at Deakin University in Waurn Ponds, Australia, and a scientific adviser to KSP. There are several reports about people killing dragons because they attacked cattle.The Flores population is considered significant because “it has been historically isolated from the western populations,” Jessop says. A 2011 mitochondrial DNA study by Evy Arida, an evolutionary biologist at the Indonesian Institute of Sciences in Jakarta, confirmed that they are quite different genetically from the populations on Komodo and Rinca. “Retaining this diversity is extremely important” for the species’s ability to respond to climate and habitat changes, Jessop says.last_img read more

Forget seabirds Baby tiger sharks feast on songbirds in the Gulf of

first_imgMatt9122/shutterstock.com Every fall, birders along North America’s Gulf Coast eagerly anticipate the arrival of a variety of songbirds. They’re not the only ones. A new study reveals baby tiger sharks regularly snack on the seasonal fliers, munching birds that fall into the sea dead or alive.The study traces back to 2010 when researchers identified a wad of slimy feathers barfed up by a baby tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) captured off the Gulf of Mexico. The sharks have been found with everything from chicken coops to unexploded ordnance in their stomachs, and the team expected the feathers to come from a seabird. Instead, they belonged to a songbird.To find out whether this phenomenon was more widespread, the team surveyed the stomach contents of baby tiger sharks from 2010 to 2018. The team caught the sharks with a rod and reel and then stuck plastic tubes down their throats before releasing the animals back to the ocean. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Forget seabirds. Baby tiger sharks feast on songbirds in the Gulf of Mexico By Alex FoxMay. 21, 2019 , 12:00 PM Forty-one of the 105 tiger sharks the researchers examined had bird feathers in their stomachs. The least digested feathers could be identified by local ornithologists, but some were so far gone they required DNA analysis. The scientists identified wrens, sparrows, and even doves in the gullets of all 41 sharks, totaling 11 different species, none of which were marine, they report today in Ecology.Researchers think the migrating birds find their way into the sharks’ mouths when fall storms knock them into the sea where—unable to take off again—they drown and become a feathered buffet. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

When green monkeys spy a drone they use their cousins cry for

first_imgJulia Fischer Humans have long looked for the origins of language in our primate cousins. But now, researchers recording the calls of West African green monkeys have underscored how different monkey communication can be from human language. A never-before-heard call the monkeys made when researchers flew a drone overhead is nearly identical to another monkey species’s cry for “eagle.” That similarity bolsters the idea that the alarms are part of a fixed repertoire of hardwired calls, very different from the creative, open-ended vocalizations of humans.East African vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) have three distinct alarm calls—one for snakes, one for leopards, and one for eagles. The West African Green monkey (C. sabaeus), the vervet’s evolutionary cousin, has alarm calls for leopards and snakes that sound nearly the same as the vervet calls. But researchers had never heard green monkeys raising the eagle alarm.To test the green monkey’s response to a new aerial threat, researchers flew a drone over a troop of the monkeys in Niokolo-Koba National Park in Senegal. Once the drone came into view, some of the monkeys produced an alarm call that the researchers had not heard in their prior 8 years of study in the park. The team recorded the calls and repeated the experiment with two other troops of green monkeys. They all produced the same unique alarm call. Days after the drone flights, the researchers played an audio recording of the drone, which caused the monkeys to sound the alarm and scan the sky. By Alex FoxMay. 27, 2019 , 11:00 AM When green monkeys spy a drone, they use their cousins’ cry for ‘eagle’ But when the researchers compared their recordings with the eagle alarm calls used by vervet monkeys (above), they found the two calls matched up almost perfectly, the researchers report today in Nature Ecology & Evolution. This uncanny similarity suggests the call’s biological underpinnings first evolved in an ancestor common to both species, researchers say. The results could lay the foundation for correlating the alarm calls with structures in the brain or segments of the monkey’s genome in future studies.last_img read more

Prehistoric Shark with SpaceshipShaped Teeth Named After an 80s Arcade Game

first_imgScientists have just named an ancient shark after an 80s video game, and it’s not just any ordinary shark. Its tiny fossilized teeth were found in the rock leftover that once contained the remains of Sue, the iconic T.Rex which remains the biggest and most complete fossil of its species so far found. The extinct shark would have traversed the rivers and wetlands of South Dakota, USA some 67 million years ago. The new find, dating to the late Cretaceous period, has been recently presented in the Journal of Paleontology.A depiction of Earth throughout the Cretaceous Period as it experienced continental drift. Photo by Glpinagelpinagel CC BY-SA 4.0“The shark lived at the same time as SUE the T. Rex, it was part of the same world,” said Pete Makovicky in a press release statement, one of the study’s authors and also a curator at the Field Museum in South Dakota where Sue is permanently exhibited.Most of the shark’s body was not preserved as “sharks’ skeletons are made of cartilage, but we were able to find its tiny fossilized teeth,” Makovicky said.Tyrannosaurus Rex specimen Sue. Photo by Zissoudisctrucker – CC BY SA 4.0The teeth, of which about two dozens were retrieved, are each “only a millimeter wide–about the diameter of the head of a pin–and the shark they belonged to was small too,” he said.“To the naked eye, it just looks like a little bump, you have to have a microscope to get a good view of it,” added Karen Nordquist, also from the Field Museum, who in fact first noticed the fossils in the remnants of Sue’s sediment.The look of the teeth was impressive enough–resembling that of the player-controlled, space fighters from the memorable 80s video game Galaga. Altogether with the name of its finder, this inspired the research team to devise the species’ scientific name as Galagadon nordquistae.Photo of hybrid Galaga and Ms. Pac Man machine, Framingham Rest Stop, MA. Photo by Brian Katt CC BY-SA 3.0The relatively small creature would have measured in between 12 to 18 inches and has been linked with modern-day carpet sharks like the bamboo shark and the wobbegong. It’s also intriguing that these analagous sharks today occupy waters mostly in the southeast Asia and Australia regions, and the Galagadon fossils showed up at a great distance from there.“We had always thought of the SUE locality as being by a lake formed from a partially dried-up river–the presence of this shark suggests there must have been at least some connection to marine environments,” Makovicky said.The extinct creature would have needed such water connections to end up in the Cretaceous rivers of South Dakota, the very same in which Sue waded through.Galagadon nordquistae likely had a face that was flat and capabilities to camouflage well, perhaps similarly to its present-day relatives. With its tiny but strong teeth, it would have broken the shells of crayfish or snails, its major source of food.Fossilized shark teeth remain to be the single greatest source of information for paleontologists to determine characteristics of lost species within this wide-spun marine, predatory family. The Galagadon find is the latest testament to that. Upon discovery, the team compared the teeth from the new find with other shark species, both living and extinct, to reach conclusions.6 Inch Megalodon Tooth VS 2 Inch Great White Shark Tooth. Each inch equates to about 10 feet of fish. 60 Foot Megalodon VS 20 Foot Great White SharkMore than that, sharks remain among the most resilient creatures to have ever roamed planet Earth. Their fossil record is abundant enough as the oldest specimens of prehistoric sharks date back to some 450 million years in time.Since then, sharks have made it through all known massive extinction events, including the one with the greatest amplitude of all. Roughly 252 million years ago, perhaps after a supervolcano erupted and acid rain fell from the skies, 90% of all life that lived on earth subsequently perished.Only 5% of sea species were saved. The event known as the Great Permian extinction is less known than the Cretaceous extinction which claimed dinosaurs roughly 65 million years ago. Regardless of the case, sharks have always made it.Read another story from us: Greenland sharks considered the world’s oldest vertebrate, with a new study dating one at up to 512 years oldIt is exactly their great ability to survive that has helped their kin reign at the top of the marine predators list and haunt the seven seas forever.last_img read more

Council considering an increase in rates

first_imgCouncil considering an increase in rates By Linda Kor      HOLBROOK — The Holbrook City Council held a discussion regarding a proposed sewer, water and sanitation rate increase that will be decided during a special meeting and public hearing to beSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad February 18, 2019last_img

Pressure builds as costs for water litigation increase

first_imgJune 19, 2019 By Linda Kor         The City of Holbrook, as well as other towns and cities that are part of the Little Colorado River water adjudication litigation taking place, is beginning to feel the strain ofSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad Pressure builds as costs for water litigation increaselast_img

New Governors appointed for Chhattisgarh Andhra Pradesh

first_imgHarichandan, who is a BJP leader from Odisha, replaces E S L Narasimhan, who was the governor of Andhra Pradesh for the last one decade. An old timer, Harichandan has been associated with the BJP since the Jana Sangh days.Uikey is a BJP leader from Madhya Pradesh and has represented the state in the Rajya Sabha. She was also vice-chairman of the SC/ST Commission. She was in the news ahead of Assembly elections in Madhya Pradesh after she praised Kamal Nath for doing good work in his constituency Chhindwada and called it a “development role model”.The post of Chhattisgarh governor was under the additional charge of Madhya Pradesh Governor Anandiben Patel. Advertising Top News Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook By Express News Service |New Delhi | Published: July 17, 2019 12:38:06 am In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief New Governors appointed for Chhattisgarh, Andhra Pradesh President Ram Nath Kovind appointed new Governors appointed for Chhattisgarh, Andhra Pradesh (File)The President on Tuesday appointed senior BJP leaders Anusuiya Uikey and Biswa Bhusan Harichandan as governors of Chhattisgarh and Andhra Pradesh respectively. Post Comment(s) NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home last_img read more

Group devoted to combating sexual harassment in science is in turmoil as

first_img#MeTooSTEM founder BethAnn McLaughlin is under fire for her management of the organization. Lane Turner/The Boston Globe/Getty Images Group devoted to combating sexual harassment in science is in turmoil as leaders exit In a brief phone interview today, McLaughlin told Science that “the concerns are totally legitimate and we’re working on them hard.”In a statement responding to the article and posted on Twitter this afternoon, McLaughlin writes: “I didn’t have the bandwidth for traditional organization hierarchy or administration people wanted.” She adds that it “is not my recollection” that she shut down other leaders who were seeking more organized roles.The Buzzfeed article also notes that the three 24 April resignations followed “a tense exchange of messages with McLaughlin after [other leaders] asked questions about MeTooSTEM’s nonprofit status and finances.”#MeTooSTEM has raised $78,000 through a GoFundMe campaign. Its web page says the organization “needs your help to take our organization non-profit.”McLaughlin announced in her statement that the group was officially incorporated as a 501(c)(3) organization with charitable status and a board of directors 2 days ago. She also wrote that the concerns that “white women were centered” in the group “are concerns I take seriously as do the folks on the Leadership Team” and the new board of directors. That board includes Nobel Prize–winning biologist Carol Greider of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.McLaughlin added, “I now realize that starting MeTooSTEM meetings ask[ing] ‘What are the things you want to talk about?’ seemed to me like an opportunity for minority voices to voice concerns. That’s not true,” because minorities may not feel empowered to speak.McLaughlin has sharp elbows and has made bitter enemies, as Science noted in a recent profile. But her testy tweets have not been on display since the Buzzfeed article appeared.Last night, the account @MeTooSTEM tweeted an apology that reads in part: “We are deeply sorry to any who have been harmed by the actions @MeTooSTEM has or has not taken, and in particular we recognize the harm to women of color.”*Update, 31 May, 2:15 p.m.: This story has been updated to include comment from BethAnn McLaughlin. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Meredith WadmanMay. 31, 2019 , 1:30 PMcenter_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Seven leaders have left the #MeTooSTEM advocacy group, founded last year to advocate for and provide legal help to survivors of sexual harassment in science. The scientists who left complained about the abrasive style of and lack of transparency from the group’s founder, neuroscientist BethAnn McLaughlin of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, as well as her perceived slights against nonwhite women, according to a report by BuzzFeed News.The article reports that the most recent resignations from #MeTooSTEM, on 24 April, included two women of color on the leadership team. The pair wrote to McLaughlin that “white leadership input was prioritized over our own” and that “MeTooSTEM receives little input from women of color.”Two white women who resigned from the organization in November 2018 wrote to McLaughlin: “We are afraid to voice our opinions” and complained that “the organization has no policies, procedures or delineated roles and our attempts to develop such have been met with resistance.”last_img read more

Researchers uncover how insect antibiotic targets Gramnegative bacteria

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 15 2018An antibiotic called thanatin attacks the way the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is built. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now found out that this happens through a previously unknown mechanism. Thanatin, produced naturally by the spined soldier bug, can therefore be used to develop new classes of antibiotics.The global emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria is posing a growing threat to human health and medicine. “Despite huge efforts from academic researchers and pharmaceutical companies, it has proven very difficult to identify effective new bacterial targets for antibiotic discovery,” says John A. Robinson from the Department of Chemistry at UZH. “One of the major challenges is identifying new mechanisms of antibiotic action against dangerous Gram-negative bacteria.” This group of bacteria includes a number of dangerous pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which causes life-threatening lung infections, and pathogenic Escherichia coli strains.Elimination of outer protective shieldAn interdisciplinary team of chemists and biologists from UZH and ETH Zurich have now uncovered how thanatin – an antibiotic produced naturally by the spined soldier bug Podisus maculiventris – targets Gram-negative bacteria. The insect’s antibiotic prevents the outer membrane of the bacteria from forming – an unprecedented mechanism in an antibiotic. All Gram-negative bacteria have a double cell membrane, with the outer membrane taking on an important defensive function and helping the bacteria to block the entry of potentially toxic molecules into the cell. The outside of this membrane is made up of a protective layer of complex fat-like substances called lipopolysaccharides (LPS), without which the bacteria could not survive.Focusing on protein-protein interactionsRelated StoriesBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerGrowth problems in preterm infants associated with altered gut bacteriaFinger-prick blood test could help prevent unnecessary antibiotic prescribing for patients with COPDUsing state-of-the-art methods, the Zurich researchers succeeded in proving that thanatin disrupts the transport of LPS molecules to the outer membrane. The transport pathway consists of a super-structure of seven different proteins that assemble to form a bridge from the inner membrane across the periplasmic space to the outer membrane. LPS molecules cross this bridge to the cell’s surface, where they form part of the structure of the outer membrane. Thanatin is able to block the protein-protein interactions that are needed to form the bridge. As a result, LPS molecules are prevented from reaching their destination and the biogenesis of the entire outer membrane is inhibited – which is fatal for the bacteria.New potential clinical candidates”This is an unprecedented mechanism of action for an antibiotic and immediately suggests ways to develop new molecules as antibiotics targeting dangerous pathogens,” explains Robinson. “This finding shows us a way to develop substances that specifically inhibit protein-protein interactions in bacterial cells.”This new mechanism is already being used by an industry partner – Polyphor AG in Allschwil near Basel – to develop new potential clinical candidates. The company has a proven track record of success in this area and has recently also developed the antibiotic murepavadin in cooperation with UZH. Murepavadin is currently in phase III clinical tests in patients with life-threatening lung infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. “Another new antibiotic targeting other Gram-negative pathogens would be a very welcome addition to the new medicines urgently needed for effective antibacterial therapy,” says Robinson. Source:https://www.uzh.ch/last_img read more

Cereset technology reduces symptoms of militaryrelated traumatic stress study shows

first_img Source:https://cereset.com/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 26 2018A new clinical study conducted by Wake Forest School of Medicine shows that use of a new non-invasive technology from the creators of Cereset not only reduces symptoms of military-related traumatic stress but also improves brain function.Cereset® is the global technology leader in brain self-restoration and optimization with franchise facilities across the United States. The clinical study, conducted by the Department of Neurology at the Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina used Cereset’s underlying HIRREM® technology. Study participants showed significantly different network connectivity on MRI brain scans after using HIRREM. This was in addition to previously reported significant reductions in symptoms of post-traumatic stress, insomnia, depression and anxiety, with reduced symptoms lasting at least 6-months.This is the first study using functional MRI (fMRI) brain imagery to demonstrate such changes with use of a noninvasive intervention for PTSD, which also reduced symptoms, and showed benefits persisting for six months. The full clinical investigative study was published in the Journal of Neuroimaging on October 10, 2018.Led by Dr. Charles H. Tegeler, McKinney-Avant Professor of Neurology, of Wake Forest School of Medicine, the study was conducted over a 12-day period with active duty and veteran U.S. military personnel with symptoms of post-traumatic stress.”Post-traumatic stress disorder affects millions of individuals around the world, not just the military participants studied in this clinical trial,” said Dr. Charles Tegeler, Neurologist at Wake Forest School of Medicine and lead researcher and co-author of this paper. “After a 12-day process, fMRI scans of the brain showed significant changes in connectivity that are consistent with the observed reduction in PTSD symptoms. The fact that this technology is non-invasive, is a non-pharmacological intervention, and does not require that the recipients ‘do anything’ other than let the brain repair itself, is very exciting.”Related StoriesWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsTransobturator sling surgery shows promise for stress urinary incontinenceCereset’s patented BrainEcho™ technology uses sensors to detect brain rhythms and proprietary algorithms that correlate those rhythms with musical tones played back to the client. The brain hears itself then naturally rebalances and repairs itself without outside intervention, stimulus or medication.”There have been several studies in the past proving the benefits of Cereset’s technology and its promoting more restful sleep, but this is the most conclusive study to date related to PTSD and our military,” said Lee Gerdes, Founder of Cereset and creator of the HIRREM technology. “Not only did symptoms improve, and the brain scans change significantly after Cereset, the benefits persisted for six months following Cereset. Over the past 15 years, more than 130,000 people have used our technology to reduce stress and improve restful sleep. I’m thrilled that this new study further validates the technology as safe and effective, exposing it to even more people seeking natural, non-pharmaceutical solutions.”last_img read more